Policies : Annual Report FY2007-2008

University of Hawai‘i-West O‘ahu Library and Academic Computing Annual Report FY2007-2008

Table of Contents

Introduction
Personnel
Public Services
Online Resources
Reference Services
Audiovisual Services
Technical Services
Collection Activities
Academic Computing
Future Challenges
Appendix A: Services, Collections, Equipment
Appendix B: Notable Staff Activities
Appendix C: Academic Computing Resources and Activities



Introduction

The UH West O‘ahu Library is housed within the Leeward Community College (LCC) Library building. We serve students, faculty, and staff in Pearl City, distributed education sites on the Maui and Kaua‘i community college campuses and West Hawai‘i Center, and several Hawai‘i Interactive Television System (HITS) sites. We also serve other distributed education students taking online classes in a wide variety of formats. The library is a member of the University of Hawai‘i Voyager Consortium as well as the Hawai‘i Library Consortium.


Our primary service groups are the students, faculty, and staff of UH West O‘ahu. There were 51 full-time faculty, 21 lecturers, and 34 staff in the fall of 2007. The fall 2007 student headcount was 940 for an increase of 8.5% over the previous fall semester. Student full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment was 522, an increase of 9.7% over fall 2006. Entering student enrollment for fall 2007 was 363 including 35 first-time freshmen.

Student enrollment highlights for 2005, 2006, 2007 are presented below:

Student Enrollment Highlights
Fall 2005
Fall 2006
Fall 2007
 
Area of Concentration
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Business Administration
286
33.3%
263
30.4%
280
29.8%
Humanities
81
9.4%
73
8.4%
72
7.7%
Public Administration
116
13.5%
118
13.6%
133
14.1%
Social Sciences
317
36.9%
341
39.4%
379
40.3%
General
--
--
--
--
12
1.3%
Unclassified
29
3.4%
40
4.6%
31
3.3%
Home-based at other UH campuses
29
3.4%
31
3.6%
33
3.5%
Total:
858
100%
866
100%
940
100%
 
Geographic Distribution
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
Number
Percent
O‘ahu
672
78.3%
671
77.5%
764
81.3%
Hawai‘i
26
3.0%
35
4.0%
37
3.9%
Kaua‘i
42
4.9%
43
5.0%
37
3.9%
Maui County
93
10.8%
103
11.9%
82
8.7%
Other Hawai‘i
--
--
--
--
1
0.1%
Other than Hawai‘i
16
1.9%
12
1.4%
13
1.4%
No data
9
1.0%
2
0.2%
6
0.6%
Total:
858
100%
866
100%
940
100%

The student data presented above is from the 2005, 2006, and 2007 Management And Planning Support (MAPS) Fall Enrollment Reports.

The library acquires, organizes, maintains, and retrieves recorded information, both print and non-print, in fields pertinent to the programs of UH West O‘ahu. In addition it offers effective and timely access to information in electronic databases (commercial, non-commercial, and government) and library catalogs throughout the world. The library is the home of academic support for the campus and also provides audiovisual and academic computing services to the UHWO community.

The library is staffed by 2.00 FTE librarians, 1.00 FTE library technician, and student assistants, and is open 59 hours per week when school is in session. There are some 27,400 books and 1,333 videos in the collections. In addition there are approximately 37,700 fulltext books available online through the Ebrary collection. The library subscribes to 48 print serials and has fulltext access to another 25,000 serials online through the Hawai‘i Library Consortium EBSCOhost databases joint purchase plan, LexisNexis, and other databases. Altogether, there are 73,000 unique (unduplicated title count) resources available online. A comprehensive list of collections and services may be found in Appendix A.

Academic Computing is staffed by 2.00 FTE Information Technology Specialists and student assistants, and provides software and hardware support for faculty computing and several programs (Library, Writing and Learning Center, Student Government) as well as the Island Pacific Academy site while managing a computer lab with 18 stations in UHWO Room D105. The lab is equipped with multimedia computers, laser printers, a scanner, and local area network and Internet access for student, faculty, and staff use. In addition there is an Instructional Media Lab for course and classroom material development in UHWO Room D104 with color printing and Real media (.rm) streaming video production and reformatting capabilities. Academic Computing provides faculty with WebCT and Laulima course management system training and support and also manages three academic Web servers. (Note: Laulima is the name of the University of Hawai‘i implementation of the Sakai collaboration and learning environment for education.)


Personnel

The library staff is comprised of Jasmine Hasegawa, Library Technician V; Margot Hanson, Librarian II; and Eric Flower, Librarian V. The library pays LCC an outsourcing fee for the services of their Automation Librarian, Ralph Toyama, for activities related to maintenance of the Voyager integrated library management system. Academic computing support and media services are provided by Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist and Stacey Sawa, Information Technology Specialist.

All library staff provide reference and research assistance as a first priority. The library provides public service in the following areas: traditional reference transactions; circulation and reserve; bibliographic and information literacy instruction; online searching; support for distributed learning as well as distance education sites on the Maui and Kaua‘i community college campuses and West Hawai‘i Center; HITS sites; interlibrary loan; library resource and information web pages; audiovisual services; and some computing support. Student assistants handle virtually all simple circulation and reserve transactions and supply answers to simple directional questions. All other questions are directed to the librarian on duty.

Collection development, online research, and outreach services are coordinated by Ms. Hanson who also provides bibliographic and information literacy instruction. Ms. Hasegawa is responsible for circulation and reserve, copy cataloging, interlibrary loan, UH Manoa audiovisual borrowing, and paperwork related to purchases of materials of all kinds. Mr. Sawa provides computer support and audiovisual services while Ms. Maeno provides WebCT and Laulima course management support, training, and academic computer support. Mr. Flower provides bibliographic and information literacy instruction as well as overall direction for library, audiovisual, and academic computing services.

Photo of Eric Photo of Jasmine Photo of Margot Photo of Linda Photo of Stacey
Eric Flower
Library Director
Jasmine Hasegawa
Library Technician
Margot Hanson
Librarian
Linda Maeno
IT Specialist
Stacey Sawa
IT Specialist

Public Services

The library was open 59 hours a week while classes were in session this year. Library hours during the fall 2007 and spring 2008 semesters were as follows:

Monday - Thursday:8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Friday:8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Saturday:9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Key public service activities include reference, circulation and reserve, provision of AV equipment and resources, delivery of online electronic resources, writing pages for Web-based access to resources, and bibliographic and information literacy instruction. Table 1 below presents comparative summary statistics for our main public service activities over the past three years.

Table 1
Comparative Use Statistics

Activity
FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Hits from the library’s two public access computers
on the library's research page
1,826
1,860
1,964
All other hits on the library's research page
73,810
83,613
95,607
Total hits on the library's research page
75,636
85,473
97,571
Circulation
2,373
2,625
2,757
Reserves
398
421
204
Videos requested from UH Manoa for faculty use
80
89
119
Interlibrary loans received from other libraries
118
107
220
Interlibrary loans sent to other libraries
230
258
205
Bibliographic/information literacy instruction classes
11
10
22

The library has a Web page for library research resources at http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/explore.htm. There were 1,964 hits on it from the two library public access computers as well as 95,607 hits on this page from all non-library locations. When library and all other locations are combined, there were 97,571 hits during the fiscal year.

Circulation was up from last year while Reserves were down. Both numbers are driven by class assignments. As more and more resources are available in electronic format, we expect the Reserve number to decrease. Library fines and fees collected for late or lost items totaled $1,069 during FY2007-2008. This compares to $1,666 collected during FY2006-2007. We see decreasing collections as a good thing. It means fewer items were lost and fewer items were returned late. Library fines and fees are used to replace lost, missing, or damaged items. They also may be used to acquire new titles or services.

Bibliographic instruction and information literacy classes are presented in response to instructor requests. They generally fall into two categories—general introductions to library information resources and how to use them, and introductions to online searching of remote databases for specific class topics. During FY2007-2008 we held 22 sessions that were attended by 374 students. This was a significant increase over the ten class sessions held during FY2006-2007 that were attended by a total of 192 students. We complemented and strengthened these sessions by creating online resource guides for every concentration. It should be noted that Margot Hanson was responsible for increasing the number of information literacy classes as well as for the creation of the online guides.


Online Resources

The UH West O‘ahu Library is a member of the Hawai‘i Library Consortium. The Consortium, led by the Hawai‘i State Library, includes the UH system libraries, the Department of Education, and private education institutions. Beginning on July 1, 2002, the Consortium banded together for a state-wide purchase of EBSCOhost databases. The outcome has given us a wide selection of databases at an attractive price.

Use of EBSCOhost databases is presented below:

EBSCOhost Databases Use
FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
On Campus Access
2,197
2,909
2,738
Off Campus Access
4,344
5,415
5,617
Searches Performed
71,720
82,513
92,196
Fulltext Articles Retrieved
22,146
23,467
24,161

Hits on selected web pages are presented below:
Account Name
Unique Visits
FY2005-2006
Unique Visits
FY2006-2007
Unique Visits
FY2007-2008
Library Research Page
73,810
83,613
95,607
Library Information Page
2,005
2,328
2,078
Library Circulation Desk
1,826
1,860
1,964
uhwolibrary.com
5,958
7,715
9,683
EBSCOhost On Campus
2,197
2,909
2,738
EBSCOhost Off Campus
4,344
5,415
5,617
LexisNexis On Campus
273
189
321
LexisNexis Off Campus
272
295
380
Database List Page
1,173
1,122
1,407

Indicators of use of selected databases are presented below:
Database Name/Service
Use in
FY2005-2006
Use in
FY2006-2007
Use in
FY2007-2008
American Council of Learned Societies E-History Books
56
5
53
AtoZ Serials Service (EBSCO)
2,081
2,360
1,704
Columbia International Affairs Online (CIAO)
287
95
76
Encyclopaedia Britannica
604
230
268
Encyclopaedia Britannica World Data
25
16
14
International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences (Elsevier)
63
137
33
Oxford University Press Oxford English Dictionary
234
356
262
Oxford University Press Oxford Reference Online
206
256
91
Note: These figures are indicative of database activity. Because each vendor counts different things-- sessions, queries, hits, page views, etc., they are not directly comparable. A complete list of our online databases with descriptions of their contents is at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/otherdatabases.html.

EBSCOhost was accessed 8,355 times during FY2007-2008, virtually unchanged from the previous fiscal year total of 8,324. Users performed more searches (92,196 vs. 82,513) and downloaded more fulltext documents (24,161 vs. 23,467) than the previous fiscal year. More users are accessing our online services from off campus locations than from on campus. It appears that searchers are searching more and being more selective in what they download. Last year searchers looked at 32,388 abstracts while this year the figure was 29,141. If they are reading the abstracts, it indicates they are being more selective before downloading fulltext. To be sure what is really happening, we'd have to use an instrument like iSkills from the Educational Testing Service. iSkills measures student ability to navigate, critically evaluate, and make sense of the wealth of information available through digital technology. iSkills assessment conforms closely to the Association of College & Research Libraries' Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.

As the tables above make clear, the library is heavily invested in online resources. In order to make access to our materials and information about the library as simple to find as possible, we have purchased the easy to remember domain name, uhwolibrary.com, which links users to our Web-based research and library information pages, information about the Computer Lab, campus wireless networks, and the MyUH portal. This page was accessed 9,683 times during FY2007-2008, up from 7,715 in FY2006-2007. Our experience is that students don't forget this web address once they've heard it. These hits represent foregone phone calls and e-mails about library hours, services, and resources, leaving staff more time to work on more difficult research problems.

Links to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Webster's Dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary, and Oxford Reference Online may be found on our “Find it Fast” page at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/finditfast.html. Complete descriptions of these and all our other databases may be found at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/otherdatabases.html.

Online Databases

This was the first complete year for several databases and online services added to our subscription lists at various times during FY2006-2007. Descriptions of those databases and their first complete year (FY2007-2008) use are presented below.


SocINDEX with Full Text (through EBSCOhost)
is the world's most comprehensive and highest quality sociology research database. The database features more than 1,660,000 records with subject headings from a 19,300 term sociological thesaurus designed by subject experts and expert lexicographers. This product also contains informative abstracts for more than 750 "core" coverage journals dating as far back as 1895. In addition, this file provides data mined from more than 575 "priority" coverage journals as well as from more than 2,800 "selective" coverage journals. Further, extensive indexing for books/monographs, conference papers, and other non-periodical content sources is included. SocINDEX with Full Text offers comprehensive coverage of sociology, encompassing all sub-disciplines and closely related areas of study. These include abortion, criminology & criminal justice, demography, ethnic & racial studies, gender studies, marriage & family, political sociology, religion, rural & urban sociology, social development, social psychology, social structure, social work, socio-cultural anthropology, sociological history, sociological research, sociological theory, substance abuse & other addictions, violence and many others. There were 1,567 sessions during FY2007-2008.

PsycARTICLES (through EBSCOhost), from the American Psychological Association (APA), is a definitive source of fulltext, peer-reviewed scholarly and scientific articles in psychology. The database contains more than 45,000 articles from 57 journals - 46 published by the American Psychological Association (APA) and 11 from allied organizations. It includes all journal articles, letters to the editor and errata from each journal. Coverage spans 1985 to present. There were 1,989 sessions during FY2007-2008.

Education Full Text brings you comprehensive coverage of an international range of English-language periodicals, monographs and yearbooks. Full text of articles cover to cover, from hundreds of journals, makes this a one-stop source for research. Education Abstracts Full Text contains abstracting and indexing coverage for over 475 periodicals included in Education Index as well as the full text of over 150 periodicals. There were 173 sessions during FY2007-2008.

Access World News is the most comprehensive collection of fulltext newspapers available. Access World News provides extensive coverage at every level—local, state, regional, national, and international. This fully searchable Web-based resource features the vast majority of the top U.S. newspapers by circulation, along with hundreds of hard-to-find local and regional titles, most of which are unavailable elsewhere. Additionally, Access World News offers hundreds of international news sources from scores of countries on six continents, translated into English when written in other languages. Access World News includes the Honolulu Advertiser from January 1999 to the present. There were 103 sessions during FY2007-2008.

The Wall Street Journal database provides fulltext coverage of The Wall Street Journal, the world's leading financial newspaper through ProQuest. Coverage dates back to 1984 and is updated daily. Each issue is indexed thoroughly, so researchers can easily access not only top news stories but also detailed information on the arts, sports, business, and popular culture. Even such items as editorials, editorial cartoons, and letters to the editor from well-known people are indexed. For each article cited in the database, an abstract of up to 75 words helps the researcher know if the complete text will meet his or her needs. (Wall Street Journal use is included with Barron's below.)

For 85 years, Barron's has been the source that America's business and financial leaders turn to every week for authoritative market analyses and insights on companies, industries, sectors, the economy and financial markets in the U.S. and around the world. Barron's delivers comprehensive statistics on the preceding week's trading and financial activities that are unmatched by any other publication, and its feature stories and columns look ahead at what's likely to happen to companies and to the market. There were 54 sessions using the Wall Street Journal and Barron's during FY2007-2008.

In January of 2007 we added AnthroSource, the premier online resource serving the research, teaching, and professional needs of anthropologists. Developed by the American Anthropological Association (AAA), AnthroSource brings 100 years of anthropological material online to scholars and the public. It includes current issues for 15 of the AAA's most critical peer-reviewed publications, including American Anthropologist, American Ethnologist, Anthropology and Education Quarterly, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly. There were 173 sessions during FY2007-2008.

During the spring 2007 semester we entered into a contract for the Ebrary Academic Complete Electronic Book Database. Academic Complete is a highly interactive electronic book database from Ebrary that covers all academic subject areas. The collection currently includes more than 32,000 book titles from more than 220 of the world’s leading academic, scientific, technical, medical, and professional publishers. Coverage includes business, marketing, and economics; computers and information technology; education; engineering and technology; health, biomedical, and clinical sciences; the humanities; life and physical sciences; and, the social and behavioral sciences. Ebrary may be searched as a standalone database and through the UH Voyager catalog. In Voyager there is a cataloging record for each Ebrary title with a link into the database from the cataloging record. There were 1,702 sessions during FY2007-2008.

LinkSource
During FY2006-2007 we also added a subscription to LinkSource, a vendor-neutral, OpenURL link resolver with item-level linking between our online services, including e-journal sites, fulltext and secondary research databases, and the Voyager catalog. With LinkSource, users can connect from the citations in one database service to the fulltext in another, maximizing the use of our fulltext collections. Linksource's key benefits include:
  • connecting patrons to fulltext content quickly and efficiently
  • maximizing the use of our collections and improving return on library dollar investment
  • saving money by reducing interlibrary loan and document delivery charges
LinkSource was used 2,754 times by students, faculty, and staff during FY2006-2007, the first year of our subscription. During FY2007-2008 LinkSource was used 4,862 times. You are using LinkSource when you click on the links in our EBSCOhost databases that look like this:

linksource icon

A Note on Under Reporting of Database Use

Many of the database session reports above under report the actual use of the databases. Most of the session figures reported above are taken from our authentication server which can only report when a session was started through it. We've found that many more links into these databases came through LinkSource. For instance, The ProQuest newspapers (Wall Street Journal and Barron's) were linked to 234 times by LinkSource. That means the searches actually started in EBSCOhost, not in the Proquest databases. Another example is from Access World News. LinkSource took the researcher from an EBSCOhost search to an Access World News fulltext article 188 times. Future evaluation of database use must include LinkSource links in addition to sessions begun in the target database itself.

Online Resources Added During FY2007-2008

Environment Complete from EBSCO
Environment Complete offers deep coverage in applicable areas of agriculture, ecosystem ecology, energy, renewable energy sources, natural resources, marine & freshwater science, geography, pollution & waste management, environmental technology, environmental law, public policy, social impacts, urban planning, and more. Environment Complete contains more than 1,772,000 records from more than 1,680 domestic and international titles going back to the 1940s (including 1,108 active core titles) as well as more than 100 monographs. The database also contains full text for more than 650 journals, including many of the most used journals in the discipline, such as Environment (back to 1975), Ecologist, Conservation Biology, etc. Additionally, Environment Complete provides full text for more than 100 monographs, such as Encyclopedia of World Environmental History (3 volumes), Advances in Water Treatment & Environmental Management, etc.

GreenFILE from EBSCO
GreenFILE offers well-researched information covering all aspects of human impact on the environment. Its collection of scholarly, government and general-interest titles includes content on the environmental effects of individuals, corporations and local/national governments, and what can be done at each level to minimize these effects. Multidisciplinary by nature, GreenFILE draws on the connections between the environment and a variety of disciplines such as agriculture, education, law, health and technology. Topics covered include global climate change, green building, pollution, sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, recycling, and more. The database provides indexing and abstracts for approximately 384,000 records. And, the price is right. EBSCO is making this database available to us and other libraries at no charge.

Language & Literature Collection from JSTOR
The titles in the collection span the literary cultures of many different countries, containing articles in several languages, including Arabic, Italian, and German. Developed with the help of the Modern Language Association, the collection includes PMLA and a range of core journals in the diverse fields of literary criticism that have emerged in the last thirty years.

JSTOR was founded in 1995 to build trusted digital archives for scholarship. Today, it works with the scholarly community to preserve their work and the materials they rely upon, and to build a common research platform that promotes the discovery and use of these resources.

With participation and support from the international scholarly community, JSTOR has created a high-quality, interdisciplinary archive of scholarship, is actively preserving over one thousand academic journals in both digital and print formats, and continues to greatly expand access to scholarly works and other materials needed for research and teaching globally.

Science Magazine online from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Founded in 1880 on $10,000 of seed money from the American inventor Thomas Edison, Science has grown to become the world's leading outlet for scientific news, commentary, and cutting-edge research, with the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general-science journal. Through its print and online incarnations, Science reaches an estimated worldwide readership of more than one million. In content, too, the journal is truly international in scope; some 35 to 40 percent of the corresponding authors on its papers are based outside the United States. Its articles consistently rank among the world's most cited research.

Our subscription covers from January 1997 to the present with abstracts/summaries, fulltext HTML, and fulltext PDF.

Wilson OmniFile Full Text Select Edition from HW Wilson
Wilson OmniFile Full Text Select Edition is a multidisciplinary, 100% fulltext database providing fulltext articles, with their accompanying indexing and abstracts. Coverage begins in 1994.

Databases in OmniFile Full Text Select include:

Applied Science & Technology Full Text with coverage of:
Acoustics, Aeronautics, Applied Mathematics, Artificial Intelligence, Atmospheric Sciences, Automatic Control, Automotive Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Communication & Information Technology, Computer Databases & Software, Construction, Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Engineering & Biomedical Materials, Energy Resources & Research, Environmental Engineering, Fire & Fire Prevention, Food & Food Industry, Geology, Industrial Engineering, Machine Learning, Machinery, Marine Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgy, Mineralogy, Mining Engineering, Neural Networks, Nuclear Engineering, Oceanography, Optical & Neural Computing, Petroleum & Gas, Physics, Plastics, Robotics, Solid State Technology, Space Science, Textile Industry & Fabrics, Transportation, Waste Management, Other Industrial & Mechanical Arts

Art Full Text with coverage of:
Advertising Art, Antiques, Archaeology, Architecture and Architectural History, Art History, Computers in Art, Crafts, Decorative Arts, Fashion Design, Folk Art, Graphic Arts, Industrial Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Motion Pictures, Museology, Non-Western Art, Painting, Photography, Pottery, Sculpture, Television, Textiles, Video

Biological & Agricultural Index with coverage of:
Agricultural Chemicals, Agricultural Economics, Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Biochemistry, Biology, Biotechnology, Botany, Cytology, Ecology, Entomology, Environmental Science, Fishery Sciences, Food Science, Forestry, Genetics, Horticulture, Immunology, Limnology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Nutrition, Physiology, Plant Pathology, Soil Science, Veterinary Medicine, Zoology

Education Full Text with coverage of:
Adult Education, Arts, Athletics, Comparative Education, Competency-based Education, Computers in Education, Continuing Education, Educational Technology, Elementary Education, Government Funding, Higher Education, Instructional Media, Language Arts, Library Science, Literacy Standards, Multicultural/Ethnic Education, Parent-Teacher Relations, Prayer in Public Schools, Preschool Education, Religious Education, School Administration, Science and Mathematics, Secondary Education, Special Education, Student Counseling, Teacher Education, Teacher Evaluation, Teaching Methods, Vocational Education

General Science Full Text with coverage of:
Astronomy, Atmospheric Science, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Conservation, Earth Science, Environment, Food, Genetics, Health, Mathematics, Medicine, Microbiology, Nutrition, Oceanography, Physics, Physiology, Zoology

Humanities Full Text with coverage of:
Archaeology, Area Studies, Art, Classical Studies, Communications, Dance, Film, Folklore, Gender Studies, History, Journalism, Linguistics, Literary & Social Criticism Literature, Music, Performing Arts, Philosophy, Religion and Theology

Index to Legal Periodicals & Books with coverage of:
Administrative Law, Antitrust Legislation, Banking, Constitutional Law, Domestic Relations, Environmental Protection, Estate Planning, Food, Drug & Cosmetic Law, International Law, Labor Law, Landlord/Tenant Decisions, Malpractice Suits, Minorities, Multinational Corporations, Negligence, Non-Profit Corporations, Occupational Health & Safety, Politics, Probate, Products Liability, Public Law, Real Property, Securities, Tax Law, Trade Regulation

Library Literature & Information Science Full Text with coverage of:
Automation, Cataloging, Censorship, Children's Literature, Circulation Procedures, Classification, Copyright Legislation, Education for Librarianship, Government Aid, Information Brokers, Internet software, Library Associations & Conferences, Library Equipment & Supplies, Personnel Administration, Preservation of Materials, Public Relations, Publishing, Web sites

Readers' Guide Full Text with coverage of:
Aeronautics, African-Americans, Aging, Astronomy, Automobiles, Biography, Business, Canada, Children, Computers, Consumer Education, Current Events, Education, Environment, Fashion, Film, Fine Arts, Food, Foreign Affairs, Health, History, Hobbies, Home, Journalism, Leisure Activities, Medicine, Music, News, Nutrition, Photography, Politics, Religion, Science, Sports, Television

Social Sciences Full Text with coverage of:
Addiction Studies, Anthropology, Area Studies, Community Health & Medical Care, Corrections, Criminal Justice, Criminology, Economics, Environmental Studies, Ethics, Family Studies, Gender Studies, Geography, Gerontology, International Relations, Law, Minority Studies, Planning & Public Administration, Policy Sciences, Political Science, Psychiatry, Psychology, Public Welfare, Social Work, Sociology, Urban Studies

Wilson Business Full Text with coverage of:
Accounting, Acquisitions & Mergers, Advertising, Banking, Building & Construction, Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals, Communications, Computers, Cosmetics Industry, Economics, Electronics, Entertainment Industry, Finance, Financial Services, Government Regulations, Health Care, High Technology, Hospitality and Tourism, Human Resources, Industrial Relations, Insurance, International Business, Investments, Management, Marketing, Mass Media, Occupational Health & Safety, Oil & Gas, Paper & Pulp Industries, Public Utilities, Publishing, Purchasing, Real Estate, Retail Trade, Small Business, Taxation, Technology, Transportation

QuickSearch Implementation of WebFeat Express Federated Searching at UH West O‘ahu

QuickSearch is the UH West O‘ahu Library implementation of WebFeat Express, a federated search engine used by libraries worldwide. Federated search engines use software designed to query multiple networked information resources through a single interface. QuickSearch can be used to search fulltext databases, library catalogs, and abstracting and indexing databases. We purchased the subscription to WebFeat Express in June of 2008 and released it to the public during the second week of July 2008. QuickSearch is the first implementation of a federated search engine in the University of Hawai‘i system libraries.


Using Advanced Search in QuickSearch:

    1. Under "Enter search criteria," select the fields you wish to search. Your choices are All, Keyword, Title, Author, Abstract, or Subject. (Keyword is the default.) Enter your search term(s).
  1. 2. You can limit the dates to be covered in the search with the "Publication date" ranges.
  2. 3. If you like, you can limit your search to "Full-text articles only" and/or "Peer-reviewed articles only" by checking the appropriate box(es).
  3. 4. If you like, you can "Select category" and use the databases the librarians have chosen for each subject by clicking on one or more subject categories. If you want to select the databases yourself, check as many as you would like from the "List of resources" below. You can select or deselect all of the databases by clicking on the Select/Deselect all box.
  4. 5. Click on the "Search" button to start your search.
  5. 6. When the search is complete, a summary of results will appear on the screen. It will have the number of hits, the database name, and a brief description of the database. Click on the database name to go to that result set then click on the "View" button to read the article.

Limitations of QuickSearch:

  1. 1. QuickSearch doesn't cover all of our databases. To see the complete list of our databases, go to http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/otherdatabases.html.
  2. 2. QuickSearch doesn't use the database's own or native interface. That means you can't do the most sophisticated kinds of searching. However, you can go directly into the database from QuickSearch and use the native interface.
  3. 3. One issue we know you'll encounter includes references to parts of databases we don't have access to. For instance, our subscription to Science Magazine online only covers from 1997 to the present, but QuickSearch will search all the way back to the first issue in 1880 unless you specify a set of dates (1997 to 2008) to limit the search.

Click here to see and use QuickSearch.

Online Database Summary

As shown above, we have a strong list of online databases supporting the curriculum. In addition we have excellent linking capabilities with EBSCO's Smart Links and LinkSource link resolver, and we have superb discovery with QuickSearch (WebFeat Express) and EBSCO's A-to-Z electronic resource locator. In short, we offer compelling content while also providing search opportunities that permit users to locate information in a variety of ways.
Turnitin Plagiarism and Detection Service

During the fall 2006 semester the faculty approved the use of the Turnitin plagiarism prevention and detection service at UH West O‘ahu. During FY2007-2008 376 students submitted 525 papers to Turnitin for 16 instructors. A description of the Turnitin implementation for students may be found at http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/turnitin/turnitinstudentinformation.html. The faculty Turnitin page is at http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/turnitin/turnitinfacultyinformation.html.

COMPASS Testing
Eric Flower and Stacey Sawa implemented the ACT COMPASS college placement testing system during the summer of 2007.


Reference Services

For many years we have kept a measure of public service activity called the "Reference / Information Service Transactions per FTE Position Count." It is an aggregate measure of staff activity collected for the annual variance reports. It includes requests for information of all kinds--reference queries, responses to phone calls and e-mails for information, directional questions in the library, etc. Transactions per FTE staff for the past three years are presented below. The lower number for FY2005-2006 was due to the library building being closed for three months for renovations. The increase for FY2007-2008 is attributable to an increase in the number of students enrolled at UH West O‘ahu.

Table 2
Reference / Information Service Transactions
per FTE Position Count, July 2005 - June 2008

FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
1,675
2,025
2,180

As noted in previous annual reports, we continue to advance the notion of offering more and more non-mediated library services to individuals (disintermediation). We strive to eliminate the mediator or "middleman." In the delivery of information services, the need for professional assistance is minimized in user-friendly systems designed to facilitate end-user searching. For instance, "Find it Fast," prominently displayed at the top center of our research page, has links to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, Oxford Reference Online, Webster's Dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary, and the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences. These titles answer many of the kinds of questions usually asked of a reference librarian. In addition, there is plenty of evidence that library users are going to Internet search engines like Google to meet more and more of their information needs. As students, faculty, and staff do more for themselves after initial training or redirection from web links, they place fewer demands in numerical terms on the library staff. The information requests students and staff now present tend to be more difficult and take longer to answer than in the past.

We are no longer collecting separate data on the UH West O‘ahu Research Helper program. The program has been renamed "Ask-A-Librarian" and the workflow for it has been integrated into daily reference activities. Figures for "Ask-A-Librarian" are included in the Table 2 above.


Audiovisual Services

We installed computers, VCRs, and LCD panels in two of the small classrooms and purchased a public address and recording system. Other audiovisual services were generally limited to routine restocking of supplies and maintenance and replacement of broken equipment. We replaced a few failed VCRs and DVD players.

One challenge came from the need for faculty support at the new freshman classrooms at Island Pacific Academy in Kapolei. In the beginning we had trouble recruiting student help so Eric Flower and Stacey Sawa took turns at the start of the fall 2007 semester. Later we had trouble keeping students. By the spring 2008 semester, the bugs had been worked out and things settled down. Statistics from the spring 2008 semester show that student assistants helped faculty with 112 instances of equipment connection or setup, mainly computers, VCRS, and SmartBoards.

The biggest area of need relates to the way budget allocations for the acquisition of videos has changed. Funds typically allocated to the library for video purchases were moved to the division budgets several years ago. And while there was a fairly large amount of money spent this year ($6,134 to purchase 68 videos), the effect has been a substantial narrowing of the audiences for the videos, with little opportunity to build a well-rounded collection.


Technical Services

The purpose of technical services is to acquire, organize, and make library materials available to the library community. Technical services activities include acquisitions or purchasing of library materials, cataloging of the materials acquired, and serials management (maintenance of subscriptions, receipt and claims, and shelving) among other things. The library buys its serials through EBSCO and its books and bibliographic records from Brodart. The LCC Library provides automation services in support of the Voyager online library system. Each year we reexamine this cost. For FY2007-2008 this was set at $1,000 for which the UH West O‘ahu Library received about 50 hours of direct service. Outsourcing the automation librarian duties to LCC has saved a substantial amount of money over the years. UH System Libraries Voyager consortium fees were $8,370 for FY2007-2008.

As we build and improve our online catalog, we must understand how library users actually use the catalog. The November 2004 issue of College & Research Libraries, (volume 65, number 6) had an article called "I Don’t Think I Click: A Protocol Analysis Study of Use of a Library Online Catalog in the Internet Age," by Eric Novotny. The abstract and conclusions are reproduced below.

Abstract: (p.525) A protocol analysis study was undertaken to explore how a Web-savvy generation of library users searches the online catalog. Eighteen users, including experienced and novice searchers, were recruited. Participants agreed to be recorded and to express their thoughts aloud while searching. Analysis of these data has revealed several distinct trends. Most notable among these trends has been the impact of Internet search engines on user expectations. Given the influence of the Web, these assumptions are likely common throughout higher education. This research reveals where bottlenecks occur and provides insights into how libraries can design systems that help users around trouble spots.


Conclusion and Directions for Further Research: (p.533) The results of this study indicate that library catalog users are heavily influenced by trends in Web searching. This is particularly evident in the newest users—novice undergraduates just entering academia. This group demonstrated a tendency for rapid-fire searching that included extensive use of hyperlinks. Both experienced and novice users adopted search strategies more appropriate to Google than to a library catalog. In general, the study participants took an unsophisticated approach to computer searching. They expected the library catalog to function as a search engine, where one types words into a box, and gets results. The standard strategy, even when looking for a known item, was to use the default keyword option. Participants demonstrated minimal knowledge of how information is structured in a library catalog and how that underlying structure affects their searches. More important, they showed no curiosity about how the catalog worked nor did they feel they should.

We acquired QuickSearch (our implementation of WebFeat Express) with these observations in mind. This federated searching tool allows us to search the online catalog as well as our online databases with a single search. In the default mode, users need only enter their keywords to begin the search process. A federated search engine breaks down the information silos between the catalog and online databases and even the information silos between different database vendors.


Collection Activities

Table 3 below outlines major acquisitions in FY2007-2008 and compares them to previous years.

Table 3
Major Acquisitions

Item
FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Books purchased
248
233
501
Total book cost
$12,773
$14,788
$23,845
Average book cost
$52
$63
$48
Gift books
46
35
16
Videos purchased
59
39
68
Total video cost
$4,818
$2,063
$6,134
Average video cost
$82
$53
$90
Print Serials
$19,006
$11,383
$8,894
Serials on microfilm
$9,231
$5,748
$800
TOTAL
$45,828
$33,982
$39,673

Back in FY2005-2006 we noted that we would reexamine our commitment to serials on microfilm as our microfilm costs had nearly doubled from FY2003-2004 to FY2005-2006. During FY2005-2006 we spent $9,231 on microfilm for titles like the Wall Street Journal, Barron's, and 21 other microfilm titles. During FY2006-2007 we dropped microfilm subscriptions to 14 titles and replaced them with online access to the journals. The benefit here is that the funds saved from the microfilm purchases were applied to database subscriptions that provided access not only to the microfilm titles we dropped, but to other titles in the databases as well. Some purchases were straight replacements. We dropped the microfilm versions of the Wall Street Journal and Barron's and replaced them with online access. In other cases we dropped groups of microfilm titles on a particular topic like psychology and replaced them with entire databases like PsycARTICLES. During FY2007-2008 we continued to drop microfilm serials as we were able to get more titles online. Currently we only buy nine serials on microfilm at an annual cost of $800.

Table 4 below compares projected costs from last year's annual report to the actual costs incurred for major acquisitions and services during FY2007-2008.

Table 4
Comparison of Expected and Actual Expenditures
for Major Acquisitions and Services FY2007-2008

Item/Service
Expected
Actual
Books
$28,000
$23,845
Videos
$5,000
$6,134
Print Serials
$12,000
$8,894
Microfilm
$6,500
$800
Equipment/computer hardware
$80,000
$73,229
Computer software/licenses
$14,000
$15,979
Commercial databases/services
$50,000
$69,250
TOTAL
$196,500
$198,131

Book purchases were more or less in line with expectations as money from Title III increased the library's usual allocation of $12,000 substantially. Some of the anticipated book allocations went to video purchases, so the total expected for books was down a little while the total expected for videos was up a little.

Microfilm purchases again decreased because we again cancelled microfilm subscriptions and replaced them with online access to the titles. The few print serial subscriptions we have now are the bare minimum. The titles are not available online in the databases we subscribe to.

During FY2007-2008 we purchased a total of 50 computer systems. Those systems accounted for the lion's share of the computer equipment and software licenses.

Commercial database expenses rose significantly due to new database subscriptions and online services including Environment Complete, Language and Literature Collection from JSTOR, Science Magazine online, Wilson OmniFile, and WebFeat Express (QuickSearch). For a more complete discussion of the new resources, see the Online Resources section above.

Table 5
Planned Expenditures on Major Acquisitions and Services
FY2008-2009

Item/Service
Expected
Books
$13,000
Videos
$3,000
Print Serials
$10,000
Microfilm
$1,000
Equipment/computer hardware
$75,000
Computer software/licenses
$15,000
Commercial database services
$75,000
TOTAL
$192,000

These figures represent a return to "normal" times. There are no increases due to Title III institutional strengthening grants.

Art Books Moved to Storage

During the fall 2007 semester we bought many education books with Title III grant money. Once they were all processed, we found we couldn't fit them all on the shelves. We proposed to the faculty that we store the art books (LC classification "N") and put the education books up in their place. The faculty had no objections, so the 204 art books were moved to an offsite storage facility until we move to the new campus at Kapolei. The bibliographic records for the books have been suppressed so they won't show up during a catalog search. Books on art topics are still available electronically in Ebrary and other online book collections.


Academic Computing

Academic Computing serves the faculty at UH West O‘ahu while also maintaining a student computer lab. Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist, provides online course development services with WebCT and Laulima, training, and help desk support. Hardware and software installation, maintenance, and help desk support are provided by Stacey Sawa, Information Technology Specialist. Academic Computing staff also review faculty requests for software and hardware and make purchasing recommendations to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Key academic computing resources, policies, procedures, and services are described in detail in Appendix C.

During January 2008 we installed 30 laptops acquired during FY2006-2007 in two classrooms for instructional use. During FY2007-2008 we installed 29 new computer systems in faculty offices and upgraded six computers in the Computer Lab. We will add another 15 laptops to a third classroom during the summer of 2008 in time for use in the fall 2008 semester.

FY2007-2008 was a time of great change and transition for online teaching. The year began with a “WebCT-in-a-Week” crash course during summer 2007, primarily for those faculty members scheduled to teach online in fall 2007, but were unable to attend workshops in the previous spring. The year ended with the first series of “Laulima Intensive Workshops”, a crash course on Laulima, the local implementation of the Sakai Online Learning and Collaboration System for UH. The “Laulima Intensive Workshops” were held in summer 2008, in an effort to train as many faculty members and instructors on the new online system.

In fall 2007, UH ITS announced that WebCT would be retired on September 30, 2008. WebCT training workshops had already begun for fall 2007 but with the announcement, all future workshops were cancelled to allow for all efforts to be placed on learning Laulima. Only one workshop, Overview of WebCT, was offered in fall 2007, along with a Laulima workshop offered at UHWO by two UH system ITS staff members.

In spring 2008, six new Laulima workshops were offered. Workshop participation reached an all time high since everyone understood the urgency of the situation; there was only the spring semester plus summer to learn Laulima, transition WebCT courses over to Laulima, and prepare new Laulima courses for fall 2008.

Total Laulima workshop attendance in spring 2008 was 62. The 62 participants were made up of 23 faculty members and 1 staff member (most attended several workshops). This number was up dramatically from the 43 participants (made up of eight faculty members and three staff) who attended workshops in FY2006-2007. All workshops were uniformly well received by those who attended.

Two sessions of “Laulima Intensive Workshops” were scheduled for summer 2008 (June 3-5 and July 14-16) to continue to train as many faculty/instructors as possible before the fall semester. These sessions were also well-attended. Many one-on-one consultations were also necessary to help individual faculty members/instructors convert WebCT courses to Laulima and learn the new system.

One hundred eighteen (118) totally online or WebCT/Laulima-enhanced courses were offered during FY2007-2008. These 118 classes were offered by 42 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. This is a significant increase from FY2006-2007 during which 91 online or WebCT-enhanced classes were offered by 34 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. Sixty two of the 118 courses (53%) were courses that were offered online for the first time, taught by faculty who hadn’t taught the course online before, or were first-time Laulima courses: 23 courses in fall 2007; 31 courses in spring 2008; and, 8 courses in summer 2008 for a total of 62 courses. For a complete discussion of online course activity and support, see the "Faculty Development Training Summary FY2007-2008" by Linda Maeno in Appendix C, "Academic Computing Resources and Activities" below.

Mr. Sawa posted 26 videos for use in online courses during FY2007-2008. These videos were reformatted only after they had met the requirements of our TEACH Act compliance checklist. Further, they were made available in a controlled environment for a limited time as required by the TEACH Act.

Mr. Flower experimented with posting classroom-based video files to the University's iTunes site for asynchronous access by students. He found the marginal time involved in reformatting to QuickTime and .3GPP movie container formats for handheld devices and multimedia phones to be of little consequence because the reformatting and uploading of the files could be done in the background while he worked on other tasks.

Mr. Flower and Mr. Sawa published the third and final article in their series on classroom-based streaming video. Links to the three papers covering synchronous and asynchronous classroom-based streaming video may be found at StreamingVideoOnTheNet.com.

During the year we acquired two sets (30 users in each) of the Turning Technologies Audience Response System. This system comes with remote controls that can be passed out to the audience and works with a Microsoft Office plug-in that allows you to create PowerPoint presentations that can tally audience responses to questions via the remote broadcasters (clicker) and receiver. These systems have been popular at other institutions and we hope to see them used by the faculty and students at UH West O‘ahu.

Information on Computer Lab use and Computer Lab printing is presented below.

FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Computer Lab Visitors:
11,357
13,387
14,883
Computer Lab Laser Printer Toner Costs:
$3,999(1)
3,302
$3,094
Computer Lab Paper Costs:
$1,302(2)
$882
$1,756
Total Computer Lab Printing Costs:
$5,301
$4,184
$4,850
(1) Reflects a charge of $892 near the end of the spring 2006 semester.
(2) Reflects a charge of $348 near the end of the spring 2006 semester.

Information on printing cost consumables in faculty offices, the Library, the Writing Center, and the Assessment Office is presented below.

         
Printing in Faculty Offices, Library,
Writing Center, Assessment Office
FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Laser Printer Toner Cartridges:
$607
$764
$778
Inkjet Printer Cartridges:
$2,037
$2,180
$2,173
Total Office Printing Costs:
$2,644
$2,944
$2,951

FY2005-2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Summary of Printing Consumable Costs for All Locations:
$7,945
$7,128
$7,801

There are two black and white laser printers in the Computer Lab for student use. Faculty offices have black and white laser or inkjet printers installed. All faculty also have access to the high speed black and white Xerox printer in the mailroom as well as to the color Xerox printer in room B105 from their office computers. We encourage faculty to use these Xerox printers whenever possible because their printing costs per page are substantially lower than the printers in the faculty offices.

Table 6 below summarizes the kind and volume of questions Ms. Maeno and Mr. Sawa receive and respond to in their support roles. The large increase in support for faculty online teaching may be attributed to the number of new faculty hired this year and to the changeover from the WebCT course management system to the new Laulima collaboration and learning environment.

Table 6
Computer Support Help Desk Activities

Activity
FY2005- 2006
FY2006-2007
FY2007-2008
Support for faculty online teaching
708
745
1,342
Software questions
311
253
390
Support for online students
182
196
137
Hardware issues (broken keyboards, monitors, etc., but not printers)
142
156
244
E-mail questions (WebMail, Outlook Express, etc.)
74
99
99
Printing (questions, paper jams, install cartridges/toner, etc.)
104
140
182
UH Username/Banner ID
35
40
42
Antivirus (questions, infections, updates, etc.)
110
166
126
Computer Lab
169
190
224
Equipment requests
126
115
187
Media requests (create CDs, diskette problems, Media Lab use)
91
62
100
Socrates (passwords, account creations, Web page updates, etc.)
38
46
50
Wired network
34
26
25
Wireless network
221
152
217
Software installations
130
73
95
Computer installations
41
82
87
Banner/Portal
24
28
17
Miscellaneous (don't fit into the other categories above)
107
103
149
Total
2,647
2,672
3,713
Ongoing Tasks:
Faculty computer maintenance
Classroom maintenance
Computer lab monitor hiring, training, & scheduling
Equipment inventory
Tracking and re-stocking supplies
Socrates backups
Training workshops
Mr. Sawa also participated in wiring and setting up the new offices in Kapolei in June 2008.

And finally, thanks once again to former UH West O‘ahu student and current IBM employee Christopher Jacoby who has given his time and provided us with valuable computing services in the form of maintaining our backup server systems. We very much appreciate his continuing efforts.


Future Challenges

During the coming fiscal year, we will see more building renovations. In the fall 2008 semester the library air conditioning system will be upgraded. While this work is underway, there will be periods when the staff will have to be relocated and the collections inaccessible. If all goes well, the work will be completed before the spring 2009 semester begins.

We need to consolidate the considerable gains we've made by adding new databases and new online services over the past two years. We will continue to aggressively market our information literacy class visits to the faculty. In addition, as we plan for a growing number of students from the millennial generation on campus, we need to keep in mind Marshall Breeding's observations in his article "Technology for the Next Generation," from the November/December 2006 issue of Computers in Libraries:

How well-suited is the current generation of library automation products and services to meet the needs of the millennial generation? I worry that too many of the library offerings on the Web may not be especially appealing. These are some of the characteristics that the millennials may not appreciate:

1. Dense, cluttered Web pages.
2. Information resources that are presented in separate information silos. Go here for books, go there for articles, look here for digital content, jump over there to request something the library doesn't have.
3. Limited user feedback. A simple mailto link just doesn't cut it for millennials who thrive on instant, online, many-to-many communications.
4. Library catalogs based on the metaphor of card catalogs, which most millennials have never used.
5. Complex search environments with poorly ordered result lists. A list that's alphabetical or chronological is tidy but often requires persistence to work through.

On September 30, 2008 the University's WebCT course management system will be shut down. For the past year we've worked closely with the faculty to provide training in preparation for the changeover to Laulima, the University's implementation of the Sakai collaboration and learning environment for education. UH ITS has been upgrading and adding tools to Laulima and Ms. Maeno has offered many workshops and provided much one-on-one consulting to faculty, so we expect the changeover to go well, though not without the occasional unforeseen difficulty. We expect the number of questions about support for online teaching to rise again as we add new faculty and also changeover to Laulima.

In addition, new programs like the Math Center and the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence will require computing support. We'll need to figure who will be responsible for their support and at what levels.

Longer term, planning for the facilities, services, and staff for the library and information technology at the Kapolei campus will continue.

In light of the challenges presented by developing information services for the new campus, this might be a good time to revisit an article I published some time ago called "Competition, Technology, and Planning for Libraries and Information Services: Theorists, Critics, and Commentators." It originally appeared in the International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management. [Papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Knowledge, Culture and Change in Organisations, University of Greenwich in London, United Kingdom, 3-6 August 2004] 4: 403-408. In the article I noted the importance of Moore's Law, Metcalfe's Law, and the Bandwidth Scaling Law in any library and information services planning process. I noted that we need to ask and answer ten critical questions as a foundation for the planning process. These questions are:

Competition
1. What competitive forces are acting on your library or corporate information service? Who are your existing rivals, potential new entrants, substitutes, customers, and suppliers?
2. How do you deal with the added forces of digitization, globalization, deregulation, and personalization?
3. What strategies do you pursue to meet these old and new competitive forces?
Technology
4. What technologies do you have in place? Do you have a strategic plan for information technology?
5. Who do you connect to, who connects to you, and how fast are your network connections to and from the outside world?
6. Do you offer a media-rich Net-centric environment? Can you reformat your online environment for presentation and interaction with a wide variety of personal handheld devices?
7. How do Moore’s Law, Metcalfe’s Law, and the Bandwidth Scaling Law impact you?
Planning
8. How will you drive down the costs of the information, communications, and services you provide while maintaining, or improving, quality of service?
9. How will you deal with “disruptive” technologies?
10. Finally, and most importantly, will you offer the right mix of services, and enter into the kinds of agreements that develop and maintain lasting relationships with both your clientele and partners?

Answers to these questions rely heavily on a well-developed campus network. We will need to build one that is:

1. Secure
2. Reliable
3. Ubiquitous
4. Fast with Quality of Service
5. Scalable
6. Easy to administer
7. Able to control sessions and resources
8. Able to create and deploy new IP services with modern service development software
9. Well integrated with the UH Information Technology Services network system

Our goal is to build a powerful media-rich collaborative networked learning environment. We'll need to integrate facilities and services at both the macro and micro levels to create the right mix of information services to meet that goal.

Annual report submitted by,
Eric Flower, Librarian V.

Originally submitted July 31, 2008.
Last modified October 30, 2008.



Appendix A
Services, Collections, Equipment

In support of its mission, the library offers the following services, collections, and equipment to students, faculty, and staff:

Services:

Collections:

Equipment:

  • DVD, VHS, and BETA players and monitors
  • Video projectors
  • 16 mm film projectors
  • 35 mm slide projectors
  • Overhead and Elmo projectors
  • Microfilm and microfiche readers/printers
  • Projection screens
  • Analog and digital video cameras
  • Computers, software, and printers
  • Scanner
  • Portable multimedia computers
  • CD/Audiocassette players/recorders
  • Audiocassette transcription machines
  • Digital cameras



Appendix B
Notable Staff Activities

Margot Hanson, Librarian II

Publications:
“Tour Offers Sampling of Law Resources,” Special Libraries Association Hawaiian Pacific Chapter Newsletter, Summer 2007, pp. 1,3.

“Life After Library School,” The Basement Blotter, vol. 5, no. 1. October 2007, p. 1.

Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:

Attended “Next Slide, Please: An Analysis and Conversation on the Uses and Misuses of Microsoft PowerPoint at Library Instruction Conferences” by David Brier and Vickery Lebbin at UH Manoa on October 3, 2007, sponsored by Hawai‘i Library Association.

Attended “TurningPoint Student Response System Demonstration” at Leeward Community College on November 13, 2007.

Attended “Top Ten Technologies & Ideas to Improve Library Technology” by Michael Stephens at UH Manoa on November 14, 2007, sponsored by Hawai‘i Library Association.

Attended “EBSCOhost Database Training” by EBSCO staff at Leeward Community College on January 14, 2008.

Conducted “Information Literacy Workshop” with Randy Hensley and Kevin Roddy of UH Libraries Information Literacy Committee at UH West O‘ahu on April 4, 2008.

Attended “Hawai‘i Voyager Users Group Annual Meeting” at UH Manoa on May 23, 2008.

Attended “Hawai‘i Library Association Spring Meeting” at Polynesian Cultural Center on May 24 2008.

Attended “LOEX of the West conference” at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas from June 4-6, 2008.

Attended “Learning Resource Center at Windward Community College” by Nancy Heu at Leeward Community College on June 20, 2008.

Service:
UH West O‘ahu:
Educational Effectiveness Committee
UH System:
Hawai‘i Voyager User Group, Treasurer
Library Information Literacy Committee
Voyager Circulation Services Committee
Library Community:
Hawai‘i Library Association Board of Directors

Memberships:

American Library Association
Beta Phi Mu
Hawai‘i Library Association University of Hawai‘i Alumni Association


Eric Flower, Librarian V

Publications:
“Asynchronous Streaming Video from the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project.” With Stacey Sawa. In Proceedings of SITE 2008 Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education Conference, March 3-7, 2008, Las Vegas. (Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education): 372-377.

Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:

Presented “Library and Information Technology Resources at UH West O‘ahu” for the Public Administration Program Review on September 17, 2007.

Viewed the “ITS Update” Brown Bag presentation on the coming Sakai implementation on September 20, 2007.

Viewed the “ITS Update” Brown Bag presentation on the coming Sakai implementation on September 27, 2007.

Viewed the ITS Brown Bag presentation on the “Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), Copyright & UH” on September 27, 2007.

Viewed the “ITS Update” Brown Bag presentation on the coming Sakai implementation on October 4, 2007.

Viewed the “ITS Update” Brown Bag presentation on the coming Sakai implementation on October 25, 2007.

Presented “Classroom-based Streaming Video at UH West O‘ahu: The State of the Art and Future Directions.” With Stacey Sawa. UH West O‘ahu Computer Lab, November 2, 2007.

Attended “TurningPoint Student Response System Demonstration” at Leeward Community College on November 13, 2007.

Attended “The Hyperlinked Library” by Michael Stephens at Hamilton Library, UH Manoa on November 14, 2007.

Attended “Laulima Training” presented by UH ITS staff at UH West O‘ahu Computer Lab on November 30, 2007.

Viewed the “UH System Strategic Priorities and Performance Measures” presentation by Linda Johnsrud on December 13, 2007.

Attended “EBSCOhost Database Training” presented by EBSCO staff at Leeward Community College on January 14, 2008.

Presented “Library and Information Technology Resources at UH West O‘ahu” for the Health Care Administration Program Review, February 25, 2008.

Presented “Asynchronous Streaming Video from the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project” at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education (SITE) 2008 annual conference in Las Vegas on March 7, 2008.

Attended “UH Information Technology Coordinators Technology Update” at UH Manoa on April 2, 2008.

Viewed “Microsoft Product Roadmap” Live Meeting presentation on April 3, 2008.

Viewed “Copyright at UH” Brown Bag presentation by Jodi Ito on April 17, 2008.

Attended “IT and Security Meetings” for new Kapolei Campus on June 5, 2008.

Attended “Learning Resource Center at Windward Community College” by Nancy Heu at Leeward Community College on June 20, 2008.

Service:

UH West O‘ahu:
Academic Affairs and Resources Committee of the Faculty Senate
Academic Development Plan Committee
ACCUPLACER Account Support
Chancellor’s Council
COMPASS Account Administrator
Health Care Administration Substantive Change Application
Lecturers’ Orientations
New Student Orientation
Public Administration Program Review
Search Committees
Taught “Computer Skills for Administrators,” Spring 2008
Tenure and Promotion Review Committee
Turnitin Account Administrator
UH System Service:
UH Library Council
Assisted with sound system and technical support for Board of Regents meeting at Kapolei, May 29-30, 2008.

Memberships:
American Library Association
Association of College & Research Libraries, College and University sections
Hawai‘i Library Association
Library Information and Technology Association
University of Hawai‘i Alumni Association


Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist

Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:

Viewed “Teaching Troubled Students: Institutional Policy and Threat Assessment” online web conference offered by Magna Online Seminars on July 25, 2007.

Attended “Microsoft Windows Vista Overview” presented by Stacey Sawa, IT Specialist, UHWO Conference Room on August 8, 2007.

Attended “Microsoft Office 2007 Overview” presented by Stacey Sawa, IT Specialist, UHWO Conference Room on August 9, 2007.

Viewed “Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), Copyright & UH” Brown Bag presentation by David Lonborg, Associate General Counsel, Office of the Vice President for Legal Affairs and University General Counsel and Jodi Ito, Information Security Officer, Information Technology Services, at LCC HITS Studio on September 27, 2007.

Viewed 9-part Series “SAKAI and Other Learning Technologies”, ITS TALENT workshop by Kenwrick Chan, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on September 20, 27, October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 2007.

Attended “UH System Strategic Plan Update” presented by Linda Johnsrud, VP Office of Planning and Policy, E104 on October 4, 2007.

Viewed “It’s Not Just ID Theft” Brown Bag presentation by Jodi Ito, Information Security Officer, Information Technology Services, at LCC HITS Studio on October 18, 2007.

Attended “TurningPoint Student Response System Demonstration” presented by Michael Muntean, Turning Technologies, LCC GT105 on November 13, 2007.

Viewed “Sakai and Other Learning Technologies” Brown Bag presentation by Kenwrick Chan, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on November 15, 2007.

Viewed multi-part Series “Intro to Laulima”, ITS TALENT workshop by Kenwrick Chan, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on February 13, 20, 27, March 5, 2008.

Viewed “Overview of Laulima” Brown Bag presentation by Kenwrick Chan, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on February 21, 2008.

Viewed “Overview of Windows Vista” Brown Bag presentation by Naomi Okinaga, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on March 6, 2008.

Viewed multi-part Series “Intro to Laulima”, ITS TALENT workshop by Linda McConnell, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on March 12 (Modules), 19 (Quizzes), April 23 (Preview of Tasks, Tests & Surveys (Laulima's, new assessment tool)) 2008.

Attended “UH Information Technology Coordinator’s Meeting” presented by ITS, Campus Center Ballroom on April 2, 2008.

Viewed “Overview of Halawai (Adobe Connect Meeting)”, ITS TALENT workshop by Linda McConnell, IT Specialist, ITS, at LCC HITS Studio on April 16, 2008.

Viewed “Copyright at UH” Brown Bag presentation by Jodi Ito on April 17, 2008.


Stacey Sawa, Information Technology Specialist

Publications:
"Asynchronous Streaming Video from the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project." With Eric Flower. In Proceedings of SITE 2008 Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education Conference, March 3-7, 2008, Las Vegas. (Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education): 372-377.
Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:
Presented “Microsoft Windows Vista Overview” in UHWO Conference Room on August 8, 2007.

Presented “Microsoft Office 2007 Overview” in Conference Room B106 on August 9, 2007.

Instructed faculty on using technology at the IPA Faculty Orientation at IPA on August 15, 2007.

Attended “TurningPoint Student Response System Demonstration” at Leeward Community College on November 13, 2007.

Attended “IT Update” at UH Manoa Campus Center Ballroom on April 2, 2008.

Attended “IT and Security Meetings” for new Kapolei Campus on June 5, 2008.

Attended “PCATT/Apple Summer Institute” at Honolulu Community College on May 19, 2008.

Attended “Island Pacific Academy Review” meeting at IPA on June 13, 2008.

Service:
UH West O‘ahu Service:
Provided equipment and technical support for the Assessment Workshop at the Okinawan Center on September 13, 2007.
Photographer for UH West O‘ahu photo shoot in Kapolei on October 30, 2007.
Photographer for UH West O‘ahu Counselor’s Luncheon at the Okinawan Center on November 2, 2007.
Videotaped UH West O‘ahu Fall 2007 commencement and set up outdoor video and sound, December 14, 2007.
Set up and operated sound system for UH West O‘ahu Spring 2008 commencement, May 17, 2008.
IT Specialist Search committee for Student Services.

UH System Service
Set up sound system and provided technical support for Board of Regents meeting at Kapolei, May 29-30, 2008.


Appendix C
Academic Computing Resources and Activities

Infrastructure:
  • Fiber backbone between buildings
  • Intra-building 100Mbps switched Ethernet to all nodes
  • Wireless network covers the UH West O‘ahu lanai, Conference Room B106, classroom D102, classrooms E101-E106, and the UHWO Library reading room; see http://www2.hawaii.edu/~uhwolab/wirelessnetwork.html for more information

Computer Lab:

  • 18 networked multimedia public stations with Microsoft Office and other software as required for classes
  • Scanner and laser printers

Media Lab:

  • Two networked multimedia stations
  • Color printer
  • Real media video encoding; live broadcast on demand with sufficient advance notification
  • CD and DVD writers
  • Zip drives

Classrooms:

  • All classrooms are wired with 100Mbps access and 802.11b wireless
  • All classrooms have overhead projectors, VCRs, DVDs, and PCs installed; VCRs, DVDs, and PCs are connected to the large screen TVs or LCDs
  • Two classrooms have SmartBoard systems installed
  • Two classrooms have laptops available for instructional use

Servers:

  • Socrates Web server; Aristotle and Plato backup servers

Computing Resources, Policies, and Procedures:


Faculty Development Training Summary FY2007-2008
Linda Maeno

FY2007-2008 was a time of great change and transition for online teaching. The year began with a “WebCT-in-a-Week” crash course during summer 2007, primarily for those faculty members scheduled to teach online in fall 2007, but were unable to attend workshops in the previous spring. The year ended with the first series of “Laulima Intensive Workshops”, a crash course on Laulima, the local implementation of the Sakai Online Learning and Collaboration System for UH. The “Laulima Intensive Workshops” were held in summer 2008, in an effort to train as many faculty members and instructors on the new online system.

In fall 2007, UH ITS announced that WebCT would be retired on September 30, 2008. WebCT training workshops had already begun for fall 2007 but with the announcement, all future workshops were cancelled to allow for all efforts to be placed on learning Laulima. Only one workshop, Overview of WebCT, was offered in fall 2007, along with a Laulima workshop offered at UHWO by two UH system ITS staff members.

In spring 2008, six new Laulima workshops were offered. Workshop participation reached an all time high since everyone understood the urgency of the situation; there was only the spring semester plus summer to learn Laulima, transition WebCT courses over to Laulima, and prepare new Laulima courses for fall 2008.

Total Laulima workshop attendance in spring 2008 was 62. The 62 participants were made up of 23 faculty members and 1 staff member (most attended several workshops). This number was up dramatically from the 43 participants (made up of eight faculty members and three staff) who attended workshops in FY2006-2007. All workshops were uniformly well received by those who attended.

Two sessions of “Laulima Intensive Workshops” were scheduled for summer 2008 (June 3-5 and July 14-16) to continue to train as many faculty/instructors as possible before the fall semester. These sessions were also well-attended. Many one-on-one consultations were also necessary to help individual faculty members/instructors convert WebCT courses to Laulima and learn the new system.

Although faculty members are faced with the challenges of learning the new system and preparing their courses, the number of faculty members/lecturers teaching online courses continues to increase, as well as the number of online offerings. Online components are also being used to a greater extent to enhance face-to-face classes.

One hundred eighteen (118) totally online or WebCT/Laulima-enhanced courses were offered during FY2007-2008. These 118 classes were offered by 42 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. This is a significant increase from FY2006-2007 during which 91 online or WebCT-enhanced classes were offered by 34 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. Sixty two of the 118 courses (53%) were courses that were offered online for the first time, taught by faculty who hadn’t taught the course online before, or were first-time Laulima courses: 23 courses in fall 2007; 31 courses in spring 2008; and, 8 courses in summer 2008 for a total of 62 courses.

Number of Online Instructors and Courses by Fiscal Year (Includes Totally Online and WebCT/Laulima Enhanced Courses)

Number of Online Instructors and Courses by Semester (Includes Totally Online and WebCT/Laulima-enhanced Courses

Faculty Development Workshops
Summer 2007
“WebCT-in-a-Week” Crash Course

A summer “crash course” on WebCT was held during the first week of July, 2007. The series of workshops was open to all faculty members and instructors, although the crash course was most essential to faculty members who were scheduled to teach using WebCT in fall 2007, but were unable to attend workshops during the spring 2007 semester. Three of the participants planned on using WebCT in fall 2007. Others came to the crash course to prepare for WebCT courses to be taught in the future. Still others came to the workshops as refresher courses.

The crash course was scheduled for July 2-6, with a break on the 4th of July holiday. Multiple workshops were scheduled in the mornings, with afternoons set aside for one-on-one consultations and time to work on individual courses. All workshops were hands-on and led by Linda Maeno.

Attendance was good with 5 or 6 participants in each workshop. Four participants came to every workshop. Two participants came for the first two days and one came for the last two days.

Here is a table listing the topics and the number of participants at each workshop:

DateTopic
# Attending
July 2Overview of WebCT
6
July 2Customizing Your Course
6
July 3WebCT Discussions and Email
6
July 3WebCT Chat and Calendar
6
July 5Using Impatica for Online Presentations
5
July 6Using Respondus
5
July 6WebCT Quiz Settings and Grading
5

Summer 2007 "WebCT in a Week" Workshop Evaluation:

Please shade the appropriate bubble completely.
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was "WebCT in a Week" helpful to you?
7
0
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
7
0
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
7
0
0
0
0

Faculty Development Workshop Evaluations
Fall 2007

Although it had been announced in spring 2007 that ITS planned to obtain a new course management system to replace WebCT, no official announcement had been made by the start of fall 2007. It seemed apparent that an extension of the WebCT license would be necessary. Based on this, seven faculty development workshops were scheduled in the UHWO Computer Lab between September 14 and November 9, 2007 to continue training faculty in WebCT.

The first WebCT workshop, “Overview of WebCT”, was held on September 14. The workshop was hands-on and led by Linda Maeno. Three faculty members attended the workshop. Soon after the workshop, ITS announced that they would begin weekly HITS training on Sakai, the new course management system for UH. Although the software had not yet been released to the UH community, it was expected to be made available some time during the semester. The scheduled end date for WebCT was set for September 30, 2008.

Because of this unexpected change, plans for training at UHWO also changed. WebCT workshops scheduled for the rest of the semester were cancelled and focus was placed on learning Sakai. Laulima, the local implementation of Sakai, was released for testing in November 2007.

Faculty members were informed about the new timetable and the end date for WebCT. They were encouraged to attend the Sakai training offered by ITS over HITS. Faculty members who would be teaching online in the spring were identified. 10 faculty members decided to use Laulima in the spring. Seven courses would be taught totally online using Laulima and Laulima would be used to enhance 12 courses (10 in-person, 1 HITS, and 1 streaming video). An on-campus Laulima workshop was scheduled for November 30, 2007. Two ITS staff members came to lead the Laulima training session. The workshop was attended by 10 faculty members/instructors and 3 staff members.

Following the training workshop, one-on-one sessions were held with faculty members to prepare their courses for spring. Major challenges included:

  1. 1. Instability of the new Laulima system, some tools did not work, some work was lost.
  2. 2. Not knowing tools well enough to know which ones to choose.
  3. 3. Uncertainty about how WebCT courses would be transitioned over to Laulima.

Only one WebCT workshop, “Overview of WebCT,” was held in fall 2007.

Fall 2007 Workshop Evaluation:

Please shade the appropriate bubble completely.
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was this workshop helpful to you?
3
0
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
3
0
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
3
0
0
0
0

Faculty Development Workshop Evaluations
Spring 2008

Spring 2008 was a challenging semester for UHWO online faculty and students. Although Laulima was available in late 2007 for testing, spring 2008 was the first full semester for Laulima. 19 courses were taught using Laulima (12 in-person, HITS, or streaming video plus 7 totally online courses) by 10 faculty members/instructors. The majority of online courses still used WebCT (38 courses by 22 faculty members/instructors). The semester started out rocky with a problem with the interface between Banner and Laulima/WebCT, plus the Laulima server crashed almost weekly. By the middle of the semester, with some upgrades and modifications, most tools were working and the system stabilized.

Six faculty development workshops were offered in the UHWO Computer Lab between February 8 and March 20, 2008. All workshops were newly created Laulima workshops. These workshops would be the basis for training the faculty on the new Laulima system. The number of faculty members/lecturers teaching online continues to increase, as well as the number of online offerings. The challenge is to transition the entire campus over to Laulima by the end of summer. Hands-on workshops listed below were led by Linda Maeno.

Plans are to offer the Laulima workshops again over the summer, once during the first summer session, and again during the second summer session. All online teachers will need to be trained on Laulima and those with existing WebCT courses will need help in converting their courses over to Laulima.

Below is a listing of the topics and the number of participants at each workshop:

Topic
# Attending
Overview of Laulima (2 sessions) + Customizing
18
Building Content in Laulima
13
Laulima Communication Tools
11
Laulima Assignments and Grade Book (2 sessions)
12
Managing Quizzes using Tests and Quizzes
8

Consolidated Spring 2008 Workshop Evaluations:

Please shade the appropriate bubble completely.
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was this workshop helpful to you?
52
10
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
59
3
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
60
2
0
0
0

Faculty Development Workshop Evaluations
Summer 2008
Laulima Intensive Workshops, Session 1

Laulima Intensive Workshops were scheduled over the summer to try to train as many faculty members and instructors on Laulima before the September 30, 2008 end-of-WebCT deadline. Beginning fall 2008, all courses with online components will use Laulima as the course management system.

Two sessions of the Laulima Intensive Workshops were scheduled over the summer. Session 1 was held on June 3-5, 2008. Two workshops were covered each day of the 3-day session. All workshops were hands-on and led by Linda Maeno.

Attendance was good with 9-10 participants in each workshop. Eight participants came to every workshop. Two participants came for two days and one came for just one day.

Below is a listing of the topics and the number of participants at each workshop:

Topic
# Attending
Overview of Laulima
9
Customizing Your Laulima Account and Courses
9
Building Content in Laulima
10
Laulima Communication Tools
10
Laulima Assignments and Grade Book
10
Managing Quizzes Using Tasks, Tests, and Surveys
10

Summer 2008 Workshop Evaluation:

Please shade the appropriate bubble completely.
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was this workshop helpful to you?
11
0
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
11
0
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
11
0
0
0
0

Evaluation data for the second Laulima Intensive Workshop held July 14-16, 2008 will be included in the annual report for FY2008-2009.