Policies : Annual Report FY2005-2006

University of Hawai‘i-West O‘ahu Library and Academic Computing Annual Report FY2005-2006

Table of Contents

Introduction
Personnel
Public Services
Online Databases
Reference Services
Audiovisual Services
Technical Services
Collection Activities
Computing Support
Future Challenges
Appendix A: Services, Collections, Equipment
Appendix B: Notable Staff Activities
Appendix C: Academic Computing Resources and Activities



Introduction

The UH West O‘ahu Library is housed within the Leeward Community College (LCC) Library building. We serve students, faculty, and staff in Pearl City, distributed education sites on the Maui and Kaua‘i community college campuses and West Hawai‘i Center, and several Hawai‘i Interactive Television Services (HITS) sites. We also serve other distributed education students taking online classes in a wide variety of formats. The library is a member of the University of Hawai‘i Voyager Consortium as well as the Hawai‘i Library Consortium.

Our primary service groups are the students, faculty, and staff of UH West O‘ahu. There were 28 full-time faculty, 16 lecturers, and 35 staff in the fall of 2005. The fall 2005 student headcount was 858 for an increase of 2.9% over the previous fall semester. Student full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment grew 2.9% to reach 490. Both figures represent historical highs for the campus. Entering student enrollment for Fall 2005 was 287.

Fall 2005 student enrollment highlights:

Area of Concentration
Number
Percent
Business Administration
286
33.3 %
Humanities
81
9.4%
Public Administration
116
13.5%
Social Sciences
317
36.9%
Unclassified
29
3.4%
Students from other campuses
29
3.4%
Total:
858
100%
 
Geographic Distribution
Number
Percent
Oʻahu
672
78.3%
Hawai‘i
26
3.0%
Kauai
42
4.9%
Maui County
93
10.8%
Other than Hawai‘i
16
1.9%
No data
9
1.0%
Total:
858
100%

The student data presented above is from the 2005 MAPS "Fall Enrollment Report."

The library acquires, organizes, maintains, and retrieves recorded information, both print and non-print, in fields pertinent to the programs of UH West O‘ahu. In addition it offers effective and timely access to information in electronic databases (commercial, non-commercial, and government) and library catalogs throughout the world. The library is the home of academic support for the campus and also provides audiovisual and academic computing services to the UHWO community.

The library is staffed by 1.5 FTE librarians, 1 library technician, and student assistants, and is open 56.5 hours per week when school is in session. There are some 27,150 books and 1,289 videos in the collections. The library subscribes to 120 serials and has full-text access to approximately 15,000 serials online through the Hawai‘i Library Consortium EBSCOHost databases joint purchase plan, LexisNexis, and other databases. Altogether, there are 22,000 unique (unduplicated title count) resources available online. A comprehensive list of collections and services may be found in Appendix A.

Academic Computing is staffed by 1 Information Technology Specialist, a .75 FTE Education Specialist, and student assistants, and provides software and hardware support for faculty computing at UH West O‘ahu while managing a computer lab with 18 stations in UHWO Room D105. The lab is equipped with multimedia computers, laser printers, a scanner, and local area network and Internet access for student, faculty, and staff use. In addition there is an Instructional Media Lab for course and classroom material development in UHWO Room D104 with color printing, CD-ROM writing, and Real media (.rm) streaming video production and reformatting capabilities. Academic Computing provides faculty with WebCT course development and support and also manages three academic Web servers.

One of the more important events of the year was the closure of the library building for flooring renovations in July, August, and September of 2005. During this period access to our book, video, print journal, and microfilm collections was severely curtailed. We moved our main point of contact to the Computer Lab in Room D105, and while this worked after a fashion, one could hardly say it was an ideal situation, as staff were housed in whatever office space could be found on campus.

On the other hand, the good news was really good. Three of our biennium budget program requests to the legislature were partially or fully funded. We received a .5 FTE position, an increase to our base budget for online databases ($12,000), and an increase to our base budget for information technology ($60,000). In addition, Humanities Professor Ross Cordy secured a $5,000 Title III grant to improve our Hawai‘i/Pacific book collection.

Personnel

The library staff is comprised of Jasmine Hasegawa, Library Technician V; Dawn Jones, Librarian II (.50 FTE); and Eric Flower, Librarian V (1.00 FTE). The library pays LCC an outsourcing fee for the services of their Automation Librarian, Ralph Toyama, for activities related to maintenance of the Voyager integrated library management system. Academic computing support and media services are provided by Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist (1.00 FTE) and Stacey Sawa, Education Specialist (.75 FTE). Congratulations to Mr. Sawa for earning his M.Ed. in Educational Technology at UH Manoa on May 14, 2006. His thesis on asynchronous streaming video was entitled "Online vs. Traditional: A Comparative Analysis of Student Grades in an Online and Traditional Face-to-Face Environment."

All library staff provide reference and research assistance as a first priority. The library provides public service in the following areas: traditional reference transactions; circulation and reserve; bibliographic and information literacy instruction; online searching; support for distributed learning as well as distance education sites on the Maui and Kaua‘i community college campuses and West Hawai‘i Center; HITS sites; interlibrary loan; library resource and information web pages; audiovisual services; and some computing support. Student assistants handle virtually all simple circulation and reserve transactions and supply answers to simple directional questions. All other questions are directed to the librarian on duty.

Collection development, online research, and outreach services are coordinated by Ms. Jones who also provides bibliographic and information literacy instruction. Ms. Hasegawa is responsible for circulation and reserve, copy cataloging, interlibrary loan, UH Manoa audiovisual borrowing, and paperwork related to purchases of materials of all kinds. Mr. Sawa provides computer support and audiovisual services while Ms. Maeno provides WebCT course management support, training, and computer support. Mr. Flower provides bibliographic and information literacy instruction as well as overall direction for library and computing services. Notable staff activities may be found in Appendix B.

Public Services

The number of hours the library was open to the public while classes were in session was 56.5 per week this year. This is the same as the previous year. Library hours during the fall 2005 and spring 2006 semesters were as follows:

Monday - Wednesday:8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Thursday:8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Friday:8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Saturday:9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Key public service activities include reference, circulation and reserve, provision of AV equipment and resources, delivery of online electronic resources, writing pages for Web-based access to resources, and bibliographic and information literacy instruction. Table 1 below presents comparative summary statistics for our main public service activities over the past three years.

Table 1
Comparative Use Statistics

Activity
FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Hits from the library’s two public access computers
on the library's research page
3,937
3,166
1,826
All other hits on the library's research page
62,010
58,813
73,810
Total hits on the library's research page
65,947
61,979
75,636
Circulation
2,881
2,859
2,373
Reserves
275
864
398
Videos requested from UH Manoa
77
116
80
Interlibrary loans received from other libraries
271
76
118
Interlibrary loans sent to other libraries
226
183
230
Bibliographic/information literacy instruction classes
13
13
11

The library is heavily invested in Web-based resources. In order to make access to our materials and information about the library as simple to find as possible, we have purchased the easy to remember domain name, uhwolibrary.com, which links users to our Web-based research and library information pages, information about the Computer Lab, campus wireless networks, and the MyUH portal. This page was accessed 5,958 times during FY2005-2006 as opposed to 5,655 times during FY2004-2005. Our experience is that students don't forget this web address once they've heard it. We believe these hits represent foregone phone calls about library hours, services, and resources, leaving staff more time to work on more difficult research problems.

The library has a Web page for library research resources at http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/explore.htm. There were 1,826 hits on it from the two library public access computers as opposed to 3,166 hits from them last year. Hits on the library research page from all other locations totaled 75,636 up from 58,813 the previous year. These figures are inline with our expectations that there will be fewer and fewer library visitors each year as more and more material becomes available online. In addition we expected the drop in the use of the library's public access computers because the library was closed during July, August, and September of 2005.

Both Circulation and Reserve use were down from last year. Neither number is a surprise as the library was closed for about three months for renovations. Library fines and fees collected for late or lost items totaled $1,080 during FY2005-2006. This compares to $1,012 collected during FY2004-2005. Library fines and fees are used to replace lost, missing, or damaged items. They also may be used to acquire new titles or services.

The volume of audiovisual material requests (videotapes and DVDs) from UH Manoa was down for the year while the number of intrasystem loans to and from other UH campus libraries was up substantially. We hope these figures are based on our growing video collection size and our selection of the right material for our users.

Bibliographic instruction and information literacy classes are presented in response to instructor requests. They generally fall into two categories—general introductions to library information resources and how to use them, and introductions to online searching of remote databases for specific class topics. We held 11 of these class sessions during FY2005-2006 which were attended by a total of 161 students. During FY2004-2005 we offered 13 classes which were attended by a total of 194 students. These classes generally emphasized finding and using material in the EBSCOHost and LexisNexis databases. Faculty are requesting fewer sessions because they believe the "the databases are so easy to use." Some were comfortable doing the instruction themselves after seeing and hearing the librarians do it previously. It's not clear from the data on the number of searches performed, and the number of articles downloaded, that students are searching effectively. It looks like they are doing more searches while downloading fewer articles.

Whichever explanation is correct, we have to improve student information and communication literacy. "ICT proficiency is the ability to use digital technology, communication tools, and /or networks appropriately to solve information problems in order to function in an information society. This includes the ability to use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate, and communicate information and the possession of a fundamental understanding of the ethical / legal issues surrounding the access and use of information." This definition is from "Succeeding in the 21st Century: What Higher Education Must Do to Address the Gap in Information and Communication Technology Proficiencies," Educational Testing Service, 2003, p. 11. The full report is at http://www.calstate.edu/LS/ICTwhitepaperfinal.pdf.

Faculty are increasingly requesting that videos be reformatted for use online. During FY2005-2006 30 videos were reformatted and made available in accordance with our rules for copyright compliance. Our "TEACH Act Checklist" form for copyright compliance has worked well and been used as a model by other campuses. Links to the checklist and other copyright documents, policies, and procedures are at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/uhwocopyright.html.

Online Databases

The UH West O‘ahu Library is a member of the Hawai‘i Library Consortium. The Consortium, led by the Hawai‘i State Library, includes the UH system libraries, the Department of Education, and private education institutions. Beginning on July 1, 2002, the Consortium banded together for a state-wide purchase of EBSCOHost databases. While our costs were virtually the same under this joint purchase, we had access to more databases than ever before. EBSCOHost was accessed 2,197 times from campus computers and 4,344 times from off campus locations during FY2005-2006. Comparable figures for the previous fiscal year were 4,550 and 2,063 respectively. Despite the decrease in sessions, 71,720 searches were undertaken versus 57,304 in FY 2004-2005. Users viewed 22,146 full-text articles as opposed to 23,762 in FY2004-2005. Two things are apparent; for the first time ever, more users are accessing our online services from off campus locations than from on campus; and second, it appears searchers are either searching more but finding less, or they are being more selective in what they download. There is some evidence they are being more selective, as searchers looked at 23,038 abstracts. They may be reading the abstracts before downloading the complete article.

EBSCOHost Databases Use
FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
On Campus Access
4,726
4,550
2,197
Off Campus Access
3,731
2,063
4,344
Searches Performed
56,614
57,307
71,720
Full-text Articles Retrieved
36,091
23,762
22,146

A complete list of our online databases with descriptions of their contents is at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/otherdatabases.html.

User counts (indicators of use) for selected web pages and other databases are presented below:

Account Name
Unique Visits
FY2003-2004
Unique Visits
FY2004-2005
Unique Visits
FY2005-2006
Library Research Page
62,010
58,813
73,810
Library Information Page
2,294
2,100
2,005
Library Circulation Desk
3,937
3,166
1,826
uhwolibrary.com
2,018
5,655
5,958
EBSCOHost On Campus
4,726
4,550
2,197
EBSCOHost Off Campus
3,731
2,063
4,344
LexisNexis On Campus
586
381
273
LexisNexis Off Campus
417
259
272
Database List Page
1,381
1,078
1,173

The library receives $6,000 annually from the campus Title III grant to develop and strengthen the library's online database subscription list. After studying patterns of distribution of underrepresented students across the divisions, we purchased subscriptions to nine online databases. Their use over the past two fiscal years is presented below. During FY2006-2007, these subscriptions will be transferred from Title III development to the library's general fund allocation. During FY2006-2007 we hope to add two new database subscriptions under the Title III development grant, Education Full-Text and PsycArticles. Eventually they will also be supported by the library's budget.

Database Name
Use in
FY2004-2005
Use in
FY2005-2006
American Council of Learned Societies E-History Books
16
56
AtoZ Serials Service (EBSCO)
2,154
2,081
Columbia International Affairs Online
256
287
Encyclopaedia Britannica
877
604
Encyclopedia Britannica World Data Analyst
24
25
International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences (Elsevier)
53
63
Oxford University Press Oxford English Dictionary
139
234
Oxford University Press Oxford Reference Online
379
206
Note: These figures are indicative of database activity. Because each vendor counts different things-- sessions, queries, hits, page views, etc., they are not directly comparable.

Links to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences, the Oxford English Dictionary, and Oxford Reference Online may be found on our "Find it Fast" page at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/finditfast.html. Complete descriptions of these and all our other databases may be found at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/otherdatabases.html.

The Title III grant also provided funds to increase remote access to library staff. After studying library staffing patterns and hours the library was open and closed, we began an online research help program. The UH West O‘ahu Research Helper was online Monday through Thursday afternoons and evenings. A description of the program is at: http://socrates.uhwo.hawaii.edu/library/researchhelper.html.

Research Helper use (queries, document supply, help with databases, etc.) is presented below.

FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
23
44
87

Reference Services

For many years we have kept a measure of public service activity called the "Reference / Information Service Transactions Per FTE Position Count." It is an aggregate measure of staff activity collected for the annual variance reports. It includes requests for information of all kinds--reference queries, responses to phone calls and e-mails for information, directional questions in the library, etc. Transactions per FTE staff for the past three years are presented below.

Table 2
Reference / Information Service Transactions
Per FTE Position Count, July 2003 - June 2006

FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
2,035
1,927
1,675

As noted in previous annual reports, we continue to advance the notion of offering more and more non-mediated library services to individuals. For instance, "Find it Fast," prominently displayed at the top center of our research page, has links to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, Oxford Reference Online, Webster's Dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary, and the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences. These titles answer many of the kinds of questions usually asked of a reference librarian. In addition, there is plenty of evidence that library users are going to Internet search engines like Google to meet more and more of their information needs. As students, faculty, and staff do more for themselves after initial training or redirection from web links, they place fewer demands in numerical terms on the library staff. The information requests students and staff now present tend to be more difficult and take longer to answer than in the past. Finally, the most recent year includes a three month period when library operations were disrupted by renovations.

Audiovisual Services

During FY2005-2006 we purchased three DVD/VCR combination units. We also added 59 videos to our collections at a cost of $4,818. A major innovation was the purchase and installation of SmartBoards for classrooms E101 and E103.

Our maintenance procedures call for classroom equipment to be inspected on a regular basis. This includes checking that equipment is working properly, that all connections are ok, and fixing any problems that are found.

Technical Services

The library buys its serials through EBSCO and its books and bibliographic records from Brodart. The LCC Library provides automation services in support of the Voyager online library system. Each year we reexamine this cost. For FY2005-2006 this was set at $1,000 for which the UH West O‘ahu Library received about 50 hours of direct service. Outsourcing the automation librarian duties to LCC has saved a substantial amount of money over the years. UH System Libraries Voyager consortium fees this fiscal year were $7,971. Last year the Voyager fee was $7,592.

In addition to normal material processing activities, the major continuing technical service activity for this year was to add records for our video collection to the Voyager database. We have approximately 1,228 videos and to date these have only been listed in a database that is printed and distributed locally. By adding these records to the Voyager database, users on other campuses may see and borrow them. To date about half of the video records have been added to the Voyager database. At some point in the future we will have to buy bibliographic records for titles that are unique to UH West O‘ahu.

Collection Activities

Table 3 below outlines major acquisitions in FY2005-2006 and compares them to previous years.

Table 3
Major Acquisitions

Item
FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Books purchased
205
276
248
Total book cost
$12,055
$13,304
$12,773
Average book cost
$59
$48
$52
Gift books
63
55
46
Videos purchased
82
49
59
Total video cost
$9,472
$2,851
$4,818
Average video cost
$58
$142
$82
Serials
$17,000
$17,000
$19,006
Serials on microfilm
$5,441
$6,351
$9,231
TOTAL
$43,968
$39,506
$45,828

Over the coming year we'll have to reexamine our commitment to archival copies of serials on microfilm. During FY2005-2006 we spent $9,231 on microfilm for titles like the Wall Street Journal and Barron's. As Table 3 shows, this cost has nearly doubled over the past three years. We can't continue to pay costs that are rising at these rates.

Table 4 below compares projected costs from last year's annual report to the actual costs incurred for major acquisitions and services during FY2005-2006.

Table 4
Comparison of Expected and Actual Expenditures
for Major Acquisitions and Services FY2005-2006

Item/Service
Expected
Actual
Books
$12,000
$12,773
Videos
$3,000
$4,818
Serials
$17,000
$19,006
Equipment/computer hardware
$25,000
$46,727
Computer software/licenses
$3,000
$4,618
Commercial database services
$12,100
$12,163
TOTAL
$72,100
$100,105

Table 5 below projects our costs for major acquisitions and services in FY2006-2007. We expect to spend an additional $4,000 on Hawaiian/Pacific books from the unspent portion of Professor Cordy's $5,000 grant. We anticipate a decline in print serial purchases due to the cancellation of 44 print titles. All of these titles will remain available online however. The money saved from the cancellations will be used to purchase more online full-text journal databases. We expect to increase online database purchases by $12,000 due to legislative approval of a biennium request. In addition we will increase information technology spending by some $60,000, also due to legislative approval of another biennium request.

Table 5
Planned Expenditures on Acquisition and Services
for FY2006-2007

Item/Service
Expected
Books
$16,000
Videos
$5,000
Serials
$10,300
Microfilm
$10,000
Equipment/computer hardware
$80,000
Computer software/licenses
$5,500
Commercial database services
$30,000
TOTAL
$156,800



Academic Computing

Academic Computing serves the faculty at UH West O‘ahu while also maintaining a student computer lab. Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist, provides online course development services with WebCT, training, and help desk support. Hardware and software installation, maintenance, and help desk support are provided by Stacey Sawa, Education Specialist. Academic Computing staff also review faculty requests for software and hardware and make purchasing recommendations to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Key academic computing resources and services are described in detail in Appendix C.

The Computer Lab had 11,357 visitors during FY2005-2006. By way of comparison, there were 8,906 Computer Lab visitors during FY2004-2005. Information on Computer Lab use and printing cost consumables is presented below. It should be noted that precise allocation of costs per year is difficult because year end purchases show up as an expense in one year while the supplies may be consumed during the following fiscal year.

FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Computer Lab Visitors:
9,439
8,906
11,357
Computer Lab Laser Printer Toner Costs:
$1,910
$1,923
$3,9991
Computer Lab Paper Costs:
$628
$883
$1,3022
Total Computer Lab Printing Costs:
$2,538
$2,806
$5,301
1 Reflects a charge of $892 near the end of the spring 2006 semester.
2 Reflects a charge of $348 near the end of the spring 2006 semester.

Information on printing cost consumables in faculty offices, the Library, the Writing Center, and the Assessment Office is presented below.

Printing in Faculty Offices, Library,
Writing Center, Assessment Office
FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Laser Printer Toner Cartridges:
$1,070
$1,295
$607
Inkjet Printer Cartridges:
$2,613
$1,880
$2,037
Total Office Printing Costs:
$3,683
$3,175
$2,644

FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Summary of Printing Consumable
Costs for All Locations:
$6,221
$5,981
$7,945

There was a large increase in both the number of Computer Lab users and the amount of money spent on printing in the Lab during FY2005-2006. To offset these student printing costs, we will ask Student Services and the Student Government to pick-up some or all of the future printing costs.

Office printing costs dropped in line with earlier projections. Faculty office computers can send large print jobs, whether color or black and white, to the Xerox printers in the Administration building. As faculty use these two printers more and more, they will use their office printers less and less. This is a good tradeoff because the per page printing costs of the Xerox printers is substantially lower than the small office printers.

Seventy completely online or WebCT-enhanced courses were offered during FY2005-2006. These 70 classes were offered by 25 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. This is an increase from FY2004-2005 when 53 online or WebCT-enhanced classes were offered by 21 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. Eighteen of the 70 courses were offered online for the first time or were taught by faculty who had not taught the course online before.

In support of these courses, fourteen workshops were offered throughout the year. Total attendance was 69. The participants were made up of 21 faculty and five staff. (Most people attended several workshops.) These sessions were uniformly well received by those who attended. See Appendix C for detailed information on the training sessions and the evaluations made by the participants.

Mr. Sawa and Ms. Maeno answered 2,647 requests for computing support during FY2005-2006. The increasing numbers of faculty teaching online (12 were new to WebCT this year), increasing numbers of online classes, and increasing use of some of the more advanced features of WebCT may be the reasons for the increasing help requests. To make the help desk as responsive as possible, they distributed a contact list for faculty technical support that tells users who to call when they have problems. Table 6 outlines the categories of questions answered.

Table 6
Computer Support Help Desk Activities

Activity
FY2003-2004
FY2004-2005
FY2005-2006
Support for faculty online teaching
474
468
708
Software questions
268
225
311
Support for online students
119
123
182
Hardware issues (broken keyboards, monitors, etc., but not printers)
105
107
142
E-mail questions (WebMail, Outlook Express, etc.)
98
82
74
Printing (questions, paper jams, install cartridges/toner, etc.)
94
125
104
UH Username/Banner ID
91
43
35
Antivirus (questions, infections, updates, etc.)
83
83
110
Computer Lab
77
102
169
Equipment requests
73
103
126
Media requests (create CDs, diskette problems, Media Lab use)
57
80
91
Socrates (passwords, account creations, Web page updates, etc.)
47
25
38
Wired network
38
29
34
Wireless network
35
83
221
Software installations
29
147
130
Computer installations
27
31
41
Banner/Portal
10
7
24
Miscellaneous (don't fit into the other categories above)
43
42
107
Total
1,768
1,905
2,647
Ongoing Tasks:
Faculty computer maintenance
Classroom maintenance
Computer lab monitor hiring, training, & scheduling
Equipment inventory
Tracking and re-stocking supplies
Socrates backups
Training Workshops

Mr. Sawa reformatted 30 videos for use online during FY2005-2006. These videos were reformatted only after they had met the requirements of our TEACH Act compliance checklist. Further, they were made available in a controlled environment for a limited time as required by The TEACH Act. As more and more classes go online, we expect the number of items to be reformatted to increase substantially.

This year we made several major purchases of computing and educational equipment. We were able to purchase and install the SmartBoards that were delayed last year. In addition, we started to replace the aging PCs in the Computer Lab. A summary of major FY2005-2006 computing expenses is presented below.

8 Faculty replacement PCs:
$11,327
5 New faculty PCs:
$7,234
6 Computer Lab replacement PCs:
$8,681
2 Notebook PCs:
$2,146
Windows 2003 server:
$2,942
Software and licenses:
$4,618
2 SmartBoards and installation:
$8,623
2 Video projectors:
$3,020
Miscellaneous upgrades and peripherals:
$2,754
Total:
$51,345

The wireless network continues to be of great interest to students and faculty. While it is manageable at its current level, we'll have to look at improving the way we add and delete users.

And finally, thanks once again to former UH West O‘ahu student and current IBM employee Christopher Jacoby who has given his time and provided us with valuable computing services in the form of maintaining our Linux backup systems. We very much appreciate his continuing efforts.



Future Challenges

This year three major library and academic computing support requests were funded by the legislature: 1) a .5 FTE personnel increase; 2) an additional $12,000 for online databases; and 3) an additional $60,000 for information technology. They represent essential investments in personnel and resources that will benefit the entire UH West O‘ahu community for years to come.

Our next considerations will be staffing for the planned campus at Kapolei. This year there were several valuable meetings with staff from ITS at UH Manoa, the campus architect, and the architect's space consultant at which we discussed and assigned office and functional space for the library, information technology, and learning assistance center academic support missions. Besides local factors, national trends from reports like the "5-10 Year Planning Horizon~Assumptions About the Relevant Future for Academic and Research Librarians and Libraries" published by the Association of College & Research Libraries in September 2005 were considered.

Preliminary staffing and some equipment requests for the new campus library, information technology services, and learning assistance center are presented below.

New Library Staff (assumes seven days a week operation):

Year 1 (10: all in year 1):
4 public services librarians: 2 Librarian IIIs and 2 Librarian IIs
1 technical services librarian: Librarian III
5 library technicians V for both public services and technical services areas

New computers and software: 10 @ $1,500 = $15,000.

Library Materials:

Electronic database subscriptions:
Year 1: $35,000
Year 2: $42,000

Books:
Year 1: Add 5,000 titles @ $48 = $240,000
Year 2: Add 5,000 titles @ $48 = $240,000

Videos:
Year 1: Add 500 titles @ $58 = $29,000
Year 2: Add 500 titles @ $58 = $29,000

Print Serials:
Year 1: $11,500
Year 2: $13,000

Computers and software for Information Commons in the Library (This will be the major campus computing lab in phase I.):
Year 1: 100 @ $1,500 each = $150,000
Or, alternatively:
Year 1: 50 @ $1,500 each = $75,000
Year 2: 50 @ $1,500 each = $75,000

Other computer hardware/software/licenses for the Information Commons:
Year 1: $20,000
Year 2: $15,000

Information Technology Services:

New IT positions (9: 7 in year 1; 2 in year 2):
Year 1 (7):
1 Director of ITS
1 Information Technology Operations Center (ITOC) manager
2 IT Specialists
1 Instructional Tech manager
2 AV/Media/Instructional Tech specialists

Year 2:
1 IT Specialist
1 AV/Media/Instructional Tech specialist

Computers for IT personnel:
15 @ $2,000 = $30,000
Software: $15,000

(Note: It is virtually impossible to give an estimate on IT infrastructure equipment costs (routers, switches, monitoring equipment and software, servers, VoIP, etc.) until we know more about the number of buildings and their configurations, how many floors in each, number of rooms per floor and their purpose, number of occupants per room, etc. In any event, these startup costs will be substantial.

Learning Assistance Center (1):

Year 1:
1 Learning Assistance Coordinator
11 computers/software @ 1,500 = $16,500

Eric Flower, Librarian V



Appendix A
Services, Collections, Equipment

In support of its mission, the library offers the following services, collections, and equipment to students, faculty, and staff:

Services:

  • Reference assistance
  • Online research help
  • Circulation of library materials
  • Reserve
  • Interlibrary and intrasystem loans of books, periodicals, AV materials
  • Bibliographic instruction
  • Access to Voyager and other databases
  • Online database searching
  • Senior project and other class online search presentations
  • Photo duplication
  • Support for outreach activities at the Maui, Kaua‘i, and West Hawai‘i campuses

Collections:

  • Books
  • Periodicals
  • Videocassettes
  • Microfilm and microfiche
  • Audiocassettes
  • 35 mm slides
  • Skeleton, disarticulated skeleton, hominid bone reproductions

Equipment:

  • DVD, VHS, and BETA players and monitors
  • Video projectors
  • 16 mm film projectors
  • 35 mm slide projectors
  • Overhead and Elmo projectors
  • Microfilm and microfiche readers/printers
  • Projection screens
  • Analog and digital video cameras
  • Computers, software, and printers
  • Scanner
  • Portable multimedia computers
  • Audiocassette players/recorders
  • Audiocassette transcription machines
  • 35 mm film and digital cameras



Appendix B
Notable Staff Activities

Dawn Jones, Librarian II

Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:
Attended Supervisory Skills Workshop led by Cindy Martin, Leeward Community College, July 29 - August 1, 2005.

Attended Basic Subject Cataloging Workshop, UH Manoa, February 21-22, 2006

Attended Serials Holdings Workshop, Richardson School of Law, March 29, 2006.

Service:
UH System:
Voyager Circulation Services Committee
UH Library Information Literacy Committee

Memberships:

American Library Association
Hawai‘i Library Association


Eric Flower, Librarian V

Publications:
"Synchronous Streaming Video from the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project." With Stacey Sawa. In Proceedings of E-Learn 2005 World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Health Care, & Higher Education October 24-28, 2005, Vancouver BC, Canada. (Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education): 654-659.

Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:

Presented “Synchronous Streaming Video From the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project” at E-Learn 2005: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, & Higher Education in Vancouver on October 26, 2005.

Attended Hawai‘i Library Association Annual Meeting and participated in a panel discussion on “The Librarian’s Role in a Googleized World” in Kohala on October 12, 2005.

Co-host (with LCC Library staff) of "Expanding the Electronic Access Horizon" seminar sponsored by EBSCO at Leeward Community College Library, March 21, 2006.

Service:

UH West O‘ahu:
Academic Affairs Committee
Academic Council
Business Administration Search Committee
Distributed Education Task Force
Kapolei Campus Development Campus
Lecturers’ Orientations
Taught “Computer Skills for Administrators,” Spring 2006
UH System Service:
Copyright and Distributed Education subcommittee of the Distributed Learning Advisory Council
UH Library Council
Provided technical support for Board of Regents meeting at Kapolei, June 15-16, 2006
Memberships:
American Library Association
Association of College & Research Libraries, College and University sections
Hawai‘i Library Association
Library Information and Technology Association
University of Hawai‘i Alumni Association


Linda Maeno, Information Technology Specialist


Conferences, Meetings, Seminars, Workshops, etc.:
Attended Ho‘ona‘auao - The Conference of Education, Enlightenment, and Learning Disability, UH Hilo, 2 sessions via Polycom in UHWO conference room, July 29, 2005.

Viewed ITS Brown Bag Session over HITS: The Current State of IT Security, Jodi Ito, October 11, 2005.

Viewed ITS Brown Bag Session over HITS: ITS Update, David Lassner, December 13, 2005.

Viewed ITS Brown Bag Session over HITS: Internet Part I, Alan Whinery, March 16, 2006.

Attended WebFun WebCT training workshops, Track A: WebCT Basic; Track B: WebCT Advanced; Track C: Course Design, Leeward Community College, May 22, 2006 - June 2, 2006.

UHWO Service:
Assisted at UH West O‘ahu Fall 2005 graduation, December 16, 2005
IT Specialist Search Committee for Office of Assessment
Committee on Protecting Confidential Information
Committee to plan UHWO Staff Development Day, February 17, 2006


Stacey Sawa, Education Specialist

Education:
Earned M.Ed. in Educational Technology, UH Manoa, May 14, 2006.
Thesis title: "Online vs. Traditional: A Comparative Analysis of Student Grades in an Online and Traditional Face-to-Face Environment."

Publications:
"Synchronous Streaming Video from the Classroom to the Remote Student’s Desktop: Report of a Distributed Education Project." With Eric Flower. In Proceedings of E-Learn 2005 World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Health Care, & Higher Education October 24-28, 2005, Vancouver BC, Canada. (Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education): 654-659.

UHWO Service:
Videotaped UH West O‘ahu Fall 2005 graduation, December 16, 2005
Assisted at UH West O‘ahu Spring 2006 graduation, May 13, 2006 (sound)
UH System Service:
Provided technical support for Board of Regents meeting at Kapolei, June 15-16, 2006


Appendix C
Academic Computing Resources and Activities

Infrastructure:
  • Fiber backbone between buildings
  • Intra-building 100Mbps switched Ethernet to all nodes
  • Wireless network covers the UH West O‘ahu lanai, Conference Room B106, classroom D102, classrooms E101-E106, and the UHWO Library reading room; see http://www2.hawaii.edu/~uhwolab/wirelessnetworkinfo.html for more information

Computer Lab:

  • 18 networked multimedia public stations with Microsoft Office and other software as required for classes
  • Scanner and laser printers

Media Lab:

  • 2 networked multimedia stations
  • Color printers
  • Real media video encoding from tape; live broadcast on demand with sufficient advance notification
  • CD writers
  • Zip drives
  • NetMeeting setup for videoconferencing

Classrooms:

  • All classrooms are wired with 100Mbps access and 802.11b wireless
  • Large classrooms all have overhead projectors, VCRs, DVDs, and PCs installed; VCRs, DVDs, and PCs are connected to the large screen TVs
  • Two classrooms have SmartBoard systems installed

Servers:

  • Socrates Web server; Aristotle and Plato backup servers

Computing Policies:


Faculty Development Training Summary FY2005-2006
Linda Maeno

Seventy completely online or WebCT-enhanced courses were offered during FY2005-2006. These 70 classes were offered by 25 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. This is an increase from FY2004-2005 when 53 online or WebCT-enhanced classes were offered by 21 faculty members, instructors, or lecturers. Eighteen of the 70 courses were offered online for the first time or were taught by faculty who had not taught the course online before.

Fourteen training workshops were offered throughout the year. Ten of the workshops were on WebCT-related topics, one was on WebMail, two were on Impatica, and one was on the Basic Socrates Homepage. (Impatica is a software tool used to convert narrated PowerPoint presentations into a format that can be streamed over the Web. Students can view course lectures using a web browser rather than RealPlayer.) The workshop on the Socrates Homepage was a new workshop developed to help faculty maintain their homepages on our academic web server.

Total attendance was 69. The 69 participants were made up of 21 faculty members and five staff. (Most attended several workshops.) The number of workshops offered equaled the number of workshops offered in the previous fiscal year (14 workshops). The number of participants increased slightly (67 participants in FY2004-2005). A large number of participants (12) were new to WebCT. They were either considering teaching online or scheduled to teach online in the near future. All workshops were uniformly well received by those who attended.

The number of faculty teaching online and courses offered (totally online or traditional courses with an online component) will continue to increase as the UHWO distance learning program expands. Training workshops must keep pace with that expansion.

Faculty Development Workshop Evaluations
Fall 2005

Faculty development workshops were scheduled in the UHWO Computer Lab between September 9 and October 28, 2005. There were a few faculty members who were preparing to teach online for the first time in spring 2006, and a growing group of online teachers who had experience teaching online. A poll of the faculty showed that the majority wanted workshop offerings on the more advanced topics related to WebCT. To help those new to WebCT get started, one-on-one meetings were offered to give the new online faculty an overview of WebCT. That helped those faculty members to have a base before they attended the WebCT workshops offered during the semester.

In October, three lecturers were hired to prep online WebCT courses to be taught in spring 2006. Two of the three lecturers had no prior experience with WebCT. The two lecturers met with me for one-on-one overviews of WebCT and also attended some of the WebCT workshops.

Plans are to offer workshops every semester, with potential summer training sessions based on faculty need and availability.

The workshops listed below were led by Linda Maeno with the exception of the Impatica workshop, which was co-led by Linda and Stacey Sawa. Evaluation forms were distributed at each workshop. Data about the workshops and excerpts from participant evaluations are presented below. (The audience text comments have been left out of this annual report for space reasons. EF.)

Below is a listing of the topics and the number of participants at each workshop:

Topic
Attendance
WebMail
4
Your Homepage
5
Customizing your Course
2
Uploading Files for Student Access
6
Using Impatica for Online Courses
7
Respondus, WebCT Quiz Settings and Grading
5
Total Attending
34

Consolidated Fall 2005 Computer Workshop Evaluations:

Question:
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was this workshop helpful to you?
34
0
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
34
0
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
34
0
0
0
0

Faculty Development Workshop Evaluations
Spring 2006

Faculty development workshops were scheduled in the UHWO Computer Lab between February 10 and June 22, 2006. The number of faculty members/lecturers teaching online continues to increase, as well as the number of online offerings. WebCT is also being used to a greater extent to enhance face-to-face classes.

The first WebCT workshop was an overview of WebCT. Three faculty members, a lecturer, and two staff members attended this workshop. They were all new to WebCT and were either scheduled to teach an online course soon, or were considering using WebCT in the future. The overview provided the “big picture” for those who attended other WebCT workshops offered throughout the semester.

Hands-on workshops listed below were led by Linda Maeno with the exception of the Impatica workshop, which was co-led by Linda and Stacey Sawa.

Evaluation forms were distributed at each workshop. Data about the workshops and excerpts from participant evaluations are presented below. (The audience text comments have been left out of this annual report for space reasons. EF.)

Topic
Attendance
Overview of WebCT
6
Discussions and E-mail
3
Chat and Calendar Tools
2
Customizing Your Course
7
Uploading Files for Student Access
4
Using Impatica to Create Online Presentations
7
Respondus, WebCT Quiz Settings and Grading
6
Total Attending
35

Consolidated Spring 2006 Computer Workshop Evaluations:

Question:
Strongly Agree
Agree
No Comment
Disagree
Strongly Disagree
1. Was this workshop helpful to you?
34
1
0
0
0
2. Do you think that the instructor presented subjects and ideas in a clear and understandable manner?
35
0
0
0
0
3. Did the instructor create an environment conducive to learning?
35
0
0
0
0


Send e-mail about this report to uhwolib@hawaii.edu.