Digital Journal Lists of Databases
See my original SAVVY SEARCHING column in Online Information Review  August, 2000. 

 

PubMed - Looking up journals in the Medline journal name index
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This option is convenient for journal titles whose lead term you know for sure. 
You immediately see the total number of records from the journals.
It is similar to the journal look-ups in  traditional MEDLINE databases, but this one is free 

PubMed - Journal Browser
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Click here to see the whole screen shot!

This Journal Browser (it is rather Journal Searcher) option is perfect for looking up journals with partially known title like medical informatics.
Clicking on the ISSN takes you to the detailed record in the free PubList database - a subset of the Ulrich's database.
Clicking on the Medline abbreviation of the title will initiate a search for records form the journal.

 

SSCI - Searchable Journal Master List 
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Click here to see the whole screen shot!

Ideal search options for a  journal base  of nearly 9,000 titles

 

ISA - no journal list but only an outdated editorial about New Journals Added to ISA that turns out to be wishful thinking when confronted  with the ugly reality 
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Handing off relevant articles from Microcomputer Abstracts (now IPCA, Internet and Personal Computing Abstracts) saves a lot of work for the ISA staff, but searching them in ISA does not save a penny for users. On the contrary, searching ISA costs twice as much as in IPCA.
We shall see that no records were added to a number of those "new" journals because they ceased publication and/or changed title before this editorial was published and this escaped the attention of the editors.

Click here to see the whole screen shot (list)!

About 95% of these journals have been abstracted for many years by Microcomputer Abstracts (now IPCA).
You would find full abstracts for many more relevant articles in Microcomputer Abstracts at much less cost ($2.70/DialUnit) than in ISA that costs $6.40/DialUnit for searching. (You may have got accustomed to such absurdities if you have been paying ISA prices for the nearly 20,000 ERIC records that were used to pad the ISA database in the 1980s and are still there at a pretty hefty surprice). 
Microcomputer Abstracts also has fuller records with URLs of companies and products that justifies its higher per record costs than in ISA ($1.75 versus $1.30). This becomes really absurd when you are searching ISA in vain at the far higher price and burn your money because you don't find articles from many of the journals that were part of the "synergy" project.

 

Reality Check as of July 4, 2000

"A number of new journals have been added...as shown in the table below"
... and a number were not, and others were abandoned
"Notice the presence of Fortune and Forbes on this list"
We diligently noticed the absolute dearth of these two journals
1998
items
1999
items
2000
items
Journals
1998
items
1999
items
2000
items
Journals
5
0
0
Al Magazine
5
0
0
Booklist
16
0
0
Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances
18
16
0
Bulletin of the Japan Special Libr.Association
1
0
0
Byte
2
0
0
Computer Life
10
4
0
Computerworld
1
0
0
DBMS
0
0
0
Digital Publishing Strategies
0
0
0
Fee for Service
1
1
1
Forbes
2
0
0
Fortune
1
0
0
Home Office Computing
4
2
0
Imaging
134
114
0
Information Today
2
1
0
InfoWorld
0
0
0
Inside the Internet
3
2
0
International Journal of Information
Sciences and for Decision Making
44
15
0
Internet World (was Webweek)
8
3
0
IntraNet Professional
2
0
0
LAN Times
18
24
0
Link-Up
5
6
0
Multimedia Schools
3
1
0
Network
2
0
0
New Media (NewMedia)
29
0
0
PC Magazine
9
6
0
PC Week
2
2
0
PC World
8
0
0
Proceedings of the Geoscience
Information Society
27
0
0
Proceedings of the Off-Campus Library
Service Conference
6
0
0
School Libraries Worldwide
6
0
0
Software Magazine
  1
WebWeek (now Internet World)
2
0
0
Windows Magazine

 

SOME ADVICE FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO BECOME  A GOOD  DATABASE EDITOR

Selecting journals for coverage by a database requires a little homework before PR. 
 Heed these recommendations to gain credibility and respect from your customers.

1.  Don't promise in August, 1998 to have added journals in 1998 that ceased publications earlier, like
        DBMS, Fee for Service, New Media, Digital Publishing Strategies

2.  Don't claim that a journal is new to your database if it was covered before such as the 
        Proceedings of the Geoscience Information Society (in 1997)  or 
        Proceedings of the Off-Campus Library Services Conference (in 1995) 

3.  Don't count your  journals before they are hatched, i.e. produced at least one record per year  like 
        Inside the Internet, AI Magazine, Booklist, School Libraries Worldwide

4.  Don't urge users to notice the presence of journals that will contribute 2 records, 1 record or no record like 
        Forbes   (1 in 1998 and 1 in 1999) or
        Fortune  (2 in 1998 and 0 in 1999) 

5.   Don't abandon a journal in the second year after you proudly announced and decently covered it like 
        PC Magazine, the bi-weekly that contributed 29 items in 1998 and 0 in 1999, and again 0 in 2000 (as of July 4)

6.   Don't abandon sources without some credible explanation that were among the three heaviest contributors among the new sources in the two previous years (1998 and 1999) like
          Information Today and
          Link-Up

 

Substantial and current information about the journals covered by H. W. Wilson 

Click here to see the whole screen shot!

H. W. Wilson provides the name of the journal, its ISSN, refereed status, and the start and -if applicable- end dates of the indexing and full-text coverage.

 

The minimalist content in the digital journal list of LISA

Click here to see the whole screen shot!

Mr. Scrooge would have been content providing such a minimalist content. In addition, the list does not include the new names of the journals that have changed title even though the continuation titles are indeed covered.

 

Compact and informative journal list of Internet and Personal Computing Abstracts (IPCA) 

This is a compact format that squeezes in a lot of relevant information about the coverage of the journals abstracted and indexed by the database. It works fine with a journal base of 100-120 journals.

Click here to see the whole screen shot (more coverage information)!

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