himb research experiences in marine science summer program

If you are a Hawai‘i public high school student and interested in learning more, please fill out the following form.

HIMB REMS is an advanced, inquiry-driven and experiential marine biology summer course that builds science and environmental literacy skills for Hawai‘i high school students and recent graduates. The goal of the program is to increase interest in marine science fields among students whose ethnicities are underrepresented in marine science majors at UH Mānoa. The program targets participation from students attending Hawai‘i Public Title I schools with native Hawaiian, Filipino, and other Pacific Islander backgrounds. The course is located at Moku o Lo‘e (Coconut Island) in Kāne‘ohe Bay and utilizes the expertise of HIMB researchers whose specialties demonstrate how human impacts and global change affect coral reef ecosystems. Topical content is taught over a two week period, with appropriate emphasis placed on marine conservation, stewardship and sustainability. At the completion of the first two weeks of instruction, student teams conceptualize and execute a ‘minii' research plan over the following three weeks. Students work both in the field and in the lab at HIMB.

The program provides students with a meaningful and robust introduction to marine biology and scientific research, as well as an improved understanding of the connection between coastal resources and the effects of human impacts and climate change on coral reef ecosystems. Equally important, it builds valuable skills in science literacy and communication, team work, leadership, and mentoring. For more information please contact us at himbed@hawaii.edu.

Participating students must be able to reside on the island of O‘ahu for the duration of the program; accomodations, transportation and supervision arranged independent of HIMB.

Download a program brochure.

Students in the summer program study the coral reefs of Moku o Lo‘e.

Investigating marine invertebrate diversity with microscope.