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Introduction to
Library and Information Science
Course Syllabus

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LIS 610

Spring 2007

Notice

This site is being reconstructed. The pages that are currently visible are from the last time I taught LIS 610, which was in 2007. Although some things will undoubtedly remain the same, please do not use the material on these pages as a definitive resource for what the course will look like or what the readings or assignments will be. The new version of this website should be up and running shortly before the semester begins.

Mahalo (thank you) for your patience.

 
Instructor: donna Bair-Mundy
Office: POST 306-D
Voicemail: 956-3973
Email: donnab@hawaii.edu
Office hours: Tuesday 4:00 - 5:00 pm, or by appt.
Web page: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~donnab/lis610



Course Description

Introduces students to the information society with an emphasis on libraries and their social utility. We consider the historical context and discuss the future of libraries and information centers in a changing technological world. Topics include: characteristics of the information professions, information ethics, intellectual freedom and intellectual property, access to information, as well as national and international library development. Prerequisite: None





Program Learning Objectives

This introductory survey course addresses the following objectives of the LIS Program, enabling students to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history, philosophy, principles, policies and ethics of library and information science and technology.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the development, organization, and communication of knowledge.
  3. Apply basic competencies and knowledge that are essential for providing, managing, and designing information services in a variety of information environments.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the development and interrelationship of librarianship and information science.
  5. Demonstrate theoretical understanding of and basic competencies in storage, retrieval, dissemination, utilization and evaluation of information sources.
  6. Demonstrate the professional attitudes and the interpersonal and interdisciplinary skills needed to communicate and collaborate with colleagues and information users.


Course Learning Objectives

This is an introductory survey course, enabling students to:

  1. Become acquainted with a variety of aspects of their chosen profession;
  2. Develop an understanding of the relationships and roles that libraries and comparable information agencies fulfill in the larger society, throughout history and into the future;
  3. Develop capacities for critical thinking, particularly in viewing major social issues and problems of concern to the profession;
  4. Gain experience in making informative presentations to colleagues on topics of interest to the profession;
  5. Gain experience in accessing information structure and assessing its uses;
  6. On a personal level, to understand the potential scope and dimensions of the careers for which they are preparing, in order to perceive their own pathways to meaningful and rewarding work.



Teaching Method

Primary emphasis is on wide reading, group discussion, and critical analysis. Oral and written assignments are designed to promote these activities. The assignment due dates are on the course schedule. Attendance and constructive participation are required.



Requirements

Readings

Textbook:
Rubin, Richard E. 2004. Foundations of library and information science. 2nd ed. New York: Neal Schuman.

Articles:

Many of the articles are available as pdf files through the University of Hawai`i Library Web site. Point your browser to http://uhmanoa.lib.hawaii.edu/webvoy.htm. Click on "Reserves." From the list of instructors select "Bair-Mundy" and click on the "Search" button. Follow the instructions regarding the .pdf settings for your browser. When you select the first article to be viewed the system will ask you to verify your UH status before proceeding.

Other articles are available elsewhere on the World Wide Web. Additional required readings will be announced in class. Please refer to the LIS 610 course bibliography for citation data.

Assignments and Grading

Assignments: Grading Scale: 90-100 = A; 80-89 =B; 70-79 =C; 60-69 =D

Technology Requirements

This course requires you to use a computer to produce all of the written assignments. PCs and Macs are available in the computer laboratories around campus and in Bilger 319.

You'll need to obtain and use your free UHUNIX email account to subscribe to lis-stu (our internal mail list for students) and to create your e-portfolio. Information about obtaining a UHUNIX account is available at the UH website. Point your browser to http://www.hawaii.edu/technology/ and select "Get a UH Username."

Students are expected to use the Internet to explore the issues presented in the course. This includes subscribing to at least two online discussion groups, locating and studying World Wide Web resources pertinent to course topics, and writing reports integrating these activities.



Course Schedule
(Subject to change)


Introduction


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

1 Jan. 9 Getting to know you;
Introduction to the course
Student introductions



Unit I: Understanding our users: information-seeking, user needs, and user interests


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

2 Jan. 16 Library use & users
Assignment:
   Informal Library Use Survey
   results due

Required readings:
    Rubin Chapt. 1,
    Jorgensen et al.; Scheppke (e-reserve)

Suggested reading:
   Westin & Finger, Gallup Poll
3 Jan. 23 Information as a user construct
Required readings:
   Rubin, pp. 31-48; B. Dervin (e-reserve)
Video:
   "From information to
   wisdom?"

Suggested reading:
   T.D. Wilson (1999 - e-reserve); Rubin pp. 34-53
4 Jan. 30 Guest speaker: Kathleen Robertson of the Institute for Astronomy Library;
Models in information behavior research
Required readings:
    Nahl
Suggested reading:
    Westbrook
Group Report:
   (Bancroft et al.)



Unit II: Types of Libraries and Information Work


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

5 Feb. 6 Types of libraries and information work
Required readings:
   Rubin pp. 361-392
Suggested reading:
   Hafner & Sterling-Folker (e-reserve)
Group Report:
   Types of
   information work

6
Feb. 13
Guest speaker: Dr. Karen Peacock (recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award at the Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives Conference!);
Types of libraries and information work (cont'd)
Required readings:
   Rubin pp. 392-430
Group Report:
   Types of
   information work




Unit III: The roles of libraries and information workers in society.


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

7
Feb. 20
Social responsibilities;
Roles of the library
Assignment:
   First paper due
Required readings:
   Rubin pp. 259-298; MacLeish (e-reserve)
Group reports:
   (Berninghausen; Wedgeworth et al.);
   (J.C. Swan)

8
Feb. 27
Guest speaker: Gwen Sinclair;
Ranganathan's Five Laws
Required readings:
   J.M. Budd (2003); Finks (e-reserve);
   M. Gorman (Five new laws - e-reserve)

Group reports:
   (J. Shera - e-reserve)




Unit IV: International and comparative librarianship.


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

9 Mar. 6 Guest speaker: Dr. Rebecca Knuth;
International and comparative librarianship;
Literacy
Required readings:
   Bliss, Knuth (e-reserve)
Group report:
   (Marcum, G. Strong, A. Gorman (e-reserve),
   DiAlesandro; Stoffle & Donnelly, (e-reserve),
   Talan, Ellingson (e-reserve)
)



Unit V: The library and information professions


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

10 Mar. 13 Guest speaker: Patricia Polansky;
Characteristics and relationships,
Professional associations
Required readings:
    Mason, Virgo (e-reserve)
Group reports:
   (White);
   (Schuman - scanned with White, McMasters)

11 Mar. 20 Education for the professions;
Accreditation and certification
Assignment:
   Second paper due
Required readings:
   J. Robbins, L. Buttlar & R. DuMont (e-reserve),
   Zyroff (e-reserve), Tees (e-reserve)

Group reports:
   (Perritt, Thomas & Perritt),
   (Avery & Ketchner),
   (M.D. Winston & D. Fisher),
   Focus groups

12 Apr. 3 Standards & guidelines;
Ethics
Required readings:
   Rubin pp. 323-331;
    RUSA guidelines,
   Gremmels, R. Stichler (e-reserve),
   Mason, Mason, & Culnan (e-reserve)

Group reports:
   (Bodi)
13 Apr. 10 Guest speaker: William Harrison, Esq.;
Access;
Intellectual freedom;
Privacy
Required readings:
   Symons & Stoffle; Rubin pp. 331-357;
   ALA Intellectual Freedom
   Manual policy on confidentiality (e-reserve),
   M. Gorman on Privacy, E. Wirth, Ang( e-reserve),
   Scenarios

Suggested reading:
   S. Vann
Group report:
   (Sheerin)



Unit VI: Information policy.


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

14
Apr. 17
Librarianship and the
  information paradigm;
Leadership in an
  information society
Required readings:
   Apostle & Raymond,
   Cleveland, P. Wilson (e-reserve)

Group reports:
   National libraries(2)
15 Apr. 24 Guest speaker: Dr. Peter Jacsó
National and state libraries;
Copyright
Assignment:
   e-portfolio due
Required readings:
   Nasri, Copyright basics,
   Fair use,
   L. Gasaway, T. Mann (e-reserve),
   Line, Sorkin & Farley (e-reserve)

Suggested readings:
    Reproductions of copyrighted works by educators and librarians, pp. 12-19
Group report:
   National libraries(2)



Unit VII: Into the future


Session


Date


Topics


Assignments due

16 May 1 Choosing our future,
Libraries and communities in the digital age,
The future of the book,
Preservation of knowledge in the electronic age
Assignment:
   Third paper due
Required readings:
   Rubin pp. 298-317, Rettig,
   Stoffle, Renaud, Veldof & responses (e-reserve),
   Miksa;
   Benton report, R. Cox (e-reserve),
   W. Crawford & M. Gorman (e-reserve)

Video:
   Into the future...

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