Kalamaku Press / Noio & Far Roads Publications

Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and Asia, in Print and Online

Dennis Kawaharada, Editor

email: dennisk@hawaii.edu

Roads of Oku: Journeys in the Heartland. Dennis Kawaharada. 2015. 224 pages. ISBN: 978-1500885113. $15.95.

Child of History
Where Kami Alight
Tracking Mankai
Fujisan and Mountain Worship
Roads of Oku
In Yukiguni
Hōkūle‘a in Yokohama

Review: "Literary, personal pilgrimage comes to life in new book," Pat Matsueda (Honolulu Star Advertiser, May 10, 2015).

For a related travel site, see Roads of Oku: Travels in Japan


Available from Amazon.com.

Local Geography: Essays on Multicultural Hawai‘i. Dennis Kawaharada. 2004. 194 pages. ISBN: 0-9709597-2-9. $9.95.

Click on the cover image or title for more information.


Available from UH Press.

Storied Landscapes: Hawaiian Literature and Place. Dennis Kawaharada. 1999. 112 pages. ISBN: 0-9623102-7-1. $8.95.

Reviewer’s Comment: “This collection [of essays] tells the stories of a number of Hawaiian places – in itself a very Hawaiian conceept, as the ancient people imbued their ‘aina with great poetic power. Kawaharada has created a work highly useful for students of Hawaii history, but also very readable; it will change and enrich your view of the islands’ landmarks.” — CL, “Best of ‘99 Nonfiction,” Honolulu Advertiser, December 25, 1999.

Reviews

.


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Hawaiian Fishing Traditions by Moke Manu and other. Published in 1992 as Hawaiian Fishing Legends. Revised Edition: 2006. 144 pages. ISBN-10: 0-9709597-5-3. ISBN-13: 978-0-9709597-5-1. $12.95.

Reviewer’s Comment: “Hawaiian Fishing Legends is another welcome volume to the body of Hawaiian literature. Besides being a good read, this one makes a lot of material available to scholars, teachers and writers. The proper practice of many of the fishing techniques described here may be forgotten, but the legends’ values, characters, and metaphors are not.“Tino Ramirez, Honolulu Advertiser, March 1992


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Ancient O‘ahu: Stories from Thrum and Fornander. Fourteen traditional Hawaiian stories set on the island of O‘ahu. First published in 1996. Revised Edition: 2001. ISBN 0-9709597-0-2. 144 pages. $8.95.

About this book: These are stories of O‘ahu before high rises, freeways and hotels, before sugar plantations and pineapple fields, before churches and Bibles. Culled from the collections of Abraham Fornander (1812-1887) and Thomas G. Thrum (1842-1932), the stories present an ancient history of the island and its first people, telling of the heroes, ancestral spirits, and demigods who performed good works and punished evil-doers. On the Recommended Summer Reading List of Kamehameha Schools.


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Voyaging Chiefs of Havai‘i. Twelve traditional stories of Polynesian voyaging migration, by Teuira Henry & Others. First published in 1995. 192 pages.


Out of Print. Expanded and reissued as an online collection in 2004, with four additional stories: Voyaging Chiefs of Havai‘i. (Click here, or on the cover image or title above.)

The Wind Gourd of La‘amaomao, by Moses Nakuina, translated into English by Esther Mookini and Sarah Nakoa. Revised Edition: 2005. 144 pages. ISBN 0-9709597-4-5. $9.95.

Reviewer’s Comment: This saga of the 16th century heroes Ku-a-Nu‘unanu, his son Paka‘a, and Paka‘a’s son Ku-a-Paka‘a is a refreshing story offering rare insights into pre-contact Hawai‘i.... Mookini and Nakoa’s The Wind Gourd of La‘amaomao is yet another important conribution to the growing canon of precious Hawaiian works rendered into English. —Niklaus R. Schiweizer, The Hawaiian Journal of History, Vol. 25 (1991).

Reviews


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

La‘ieikawai by S.N. Haleole tells the story of the wooing of a young native chiefess of great beauty and high rank, her fall from grace, and her final deification among the gods. The story was serialized in Hawaiian in 1862-1863 in Ka Nupepa Kuokoa and published as a book in 1863. This edition is a modernized version of the classic Martha W. Beckwith translation, first published in 1919. 144 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0-9709597-6-8. ISBN-10: 0-9709597-6-1. $12.95.


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Kalahele: Poetry and Art. Poetry by ‘Imaikalani Kalahele. 2002. 90 pages. ISBN 0-9709597-1-0. $9.95.

Reviewer’s Comment: ‘Imaikalani Kalahele’s self-named collection of poetry and art, Kalahele, gives utterance the force of an indigenous Pacific voice. The poet sings in mythic songs of friendship and good fellowship, chants of resistance, and rebukes in the utterances of contemporary Hawaiians.... The Hawaiian artist and poet mediates between ancestral knowlege and modern influences in a lace of art and poetry that floats on the currents of the Pacific, across the islands and in space...The collection is a superb display of poetic skills, language use, and appropriation of forms available to the Pacific writer. Steven Winduo, University of Papua New Guinea, The Contemporary Pacific, Fall 2003.

Sample Poems and Art


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Child of War. Poetry by Genny Lim. 2003. 78 pages. ISBN: 0-9709597-3-7. $10.00.

Reviewer’s Comment: A deeply moving and affirming work of acceptance and resistance. The poems unfold out of the tragic death of Lim’s nineteen-year-old daughter, Danielle, and expand into the perpetually war-torn world of crisis and uncertainty. This is a rich gathering of sorrow, joy, and affirmation. —David Meltzer, author of San Francisco Beat: Talking with Poets


Click on the cover image or title for more information.

Available from UH Press.

Kalamaku Press / Noio and Far Roads Publications are Distributed by

Note: Boldfaced vowels (marked by a macron in printed texts) are longer than unmarked vowels in Hawaiian words. For example, the first “a” in Pa‘ao is longer than the second one. The ‘ represents a glottal stop in a glottal stop, similar to the sound between the oh’s in English oh-oh. An online Hawaiian dictionary can be found at http://wehewehe.org/cgi-bin/hdict.