H 1928 Personal Narratives

 

BACKGROUND: The subdivision –Personal narratives is a free-floating form subdivision used under names of events and wars for collective or individual eyewitness reports and/or autobiograph ical accounts of these events and wars. Prior to 1977, the subdivision was used more widely under classes of persons, types of activities, and diseases. Those uses were replaced by the subdivision –Biography under classes of persons. For instructions on assigning headings to diaries and journals, see H 1538. For instructions on assigning headings to personal correspondence, see H 1480.

 

1. General rule. Use the subdivision –Personal narratives under names of individual events or wars.

If the work being cataloged covers a particular event such as a battle which is part of a larger conflict, assign the heading for the specific event subdivided by –Personal narratives.

 

2. National or ethnic qualifier. When used under names of wars, battles, etc., qualify the subdivision –Personal narratives by a national or ethnic qualifier to bring out the nationality or ethnic background of the narrator(s) of the account(s), for example, World War, 1939-1945–Personal narratives, American.

Under names of events not associated with a war or military conflict, omit the national or ethnic qualifier.

 

3. Assignment of subject headings.

a. Name heading for the person. For individual personal narratives, assign the name of the author of the work as a subject heading.

 

b. [Class of persons]–Biography. If an individual personal narrative contains at least 50% autobiographical information, treat it as a biography following the provisions of H 1330. If the work is an eyewitness report containing less than

50% autobiographical details, do not treat it as a biography.

 

c. Other subject headings. Assign other subject headings as appropriate to the work being cataloged.

 

4. Order of headings.

a. Narratives that include personal information about the author. If an individual personal narrative contains a significant amount of personal information regarding the author, assign the name of the author as the first subject heading.

 

b. Narratives with little personal information about the author. If the narrative is essentially an eyewitness account of what happened with little personal information about the author, assign the name of the war or event as the first subject heading; assign the name of the author as an additional subject heading.

5. MARC 21 biography coding. Assign code a, c, or d, as appropriate in field 008/34 (the box labeled Biography on the 008 input screen in the LC ILS).


6. Examples.

Title:   Few eggs and no oranges.

[diary about Londoners during World War II]

600 10 $a [name of author] $v Diaries.

650 #0 $a World War, 1939-1945 $v Personal narratives, British.

651 #0 $a London (England) $v Biography.

 

Title:   A rumor of war.

600 10 $a [name of author]

650 #0 $a Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975 $v Personal narratives, American.

650 #0 $a Soldiers $z United States $v Biography.

610 10 $a United States. $b Marine Corps $v Biography.

 

Title:   Adventure in diplomacy : our French dilemma.

650 #0 $a World War, 1939-1945 $x Africa, North.

650 #0 $a World War, 1939-1945 $x Diplomatic history.

600 10 $a [name of author]

650 #0 $a World War, 1939-1945 $v Personal narratives, American.

 

Title:   The year of the buzz bomb; a journal of London, 1944.

651 #0 $a London (England) $x History $y Bombardment, 1944 $v Personal narratives, American.

600 10 $a [name of author] $v Diaries.

650 #0 $a World War, 1939-1945 $z England $z London.

650 #0 $a Guided missiles $x History.

 

 

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