LANGUAGE SAMPLES FROM PIDGIN SPEAKERS
WHOSE FIRST LANGUAGE IS JAPANESE 1

FJ66K

ada vaekyum klina no kaen yuz?

Can't you use the other vacuum cleaner?

MJ77K

daet taim sevnti-wan-go-taim eirplein, ye, japaen go.

That time, when (we) went in `71, (we) went to Japan by plane

FJ66K

da rich pipol dakain it da rais, da pua pipl awl poteto it.

The rich kind of people (in Okinawa) eat rice while the poor all eat potatoes.

 

bat as ova-hia-bawn-taim aes wai onli so mach rais it, e?

But that's why we who were born over here eat so much rice.

 

ai laik daet poteto, ye swit poteto, bat no, difrent kain swit poteto.

 

 

ril ono, insaid pat prpl, no, its min okinawa wrd, no, aes tumaikru, e, da poteto neim, yo.

It's real tasty, the inside part is purple; tumaikru is the Okinawan word for that kind of potato.

 

awl kain neim get.

It has several different names.

 

hawaii, ai no wi--hawaii, onli ai si, a, red wan, ai si.

I haven't seen any in Hawaii, in Hawaii I've only seen red ones.

 

aend, a, luk-laik-pankin-kain get.

And there are some that look like pumpkins.

Interviewer

but get purple-inside-kind, no?

 

FJ66K

ai no si am

I haven't seen any.

MJ92H

mil-hapai-taim, ye, tu-tri sen kam ap.

When I took (the coffee) to the mill, (the price) had risen by two or three cents (a pound).

FJ70K

bat mi-kam-taim, no, lito bit moa, pei ap yo, no?

But when I came, pay had gone up a little, hadn't it?

FJ59H

aen den kam-home-taim, no, chainiz taun go.

And then when it was time to go home, (we) went to Chinatown.

MJ66H

as-bihow-stei-taim difrent.

It was different when we stayed here before.

MJ77K

hauli haus insai kuk, daet taim, no sabei tawk, ye?

(I was) cook in a white man's house, and at that time (I) didn't know how to speak (English), you know.

FJ60K

sam pat, no, de dono andastaen, aeswai de go kweschen tu mi, no, sambadi-stei-tawking-taim.

There are some parts (of Japanese) they (her daughters) don't understand, that's why they ask me questions when people are talking Japanese.

MJ66H

aes kain, laik kech, ei?

enibadi amerkan botu kam mechiko, bebri, bihow inspek, adawaiz no kaen kech fish.

That's the kind (that) you want to catch, eh?

Anyone on an American boat (who) comes to Mexico, bribery (has to pay a bribe), before the inspection (by fisheries officials), otherwise he won't be allowed to catch fish.

FJ60K

ai tink dei mos da kain dei bak, no, kwik, yo, aen den da kain, dei go teik kea.

I think they're mostly the kind that bark, right, very quickly, and the kind that'll make good watchdogs.

MJ77K

bihoa mil, no moa hilipino no nating--hawl jaepaniz.

Before the mill (was built), (there were) no Filipinos at all, everybody (was) Japanese.

MJ92H

baimbai mi oni stoa, rait?

Soon I (had) only the store, you understand?

FJ66K

no, filipino, ya hawaian, enikain miks, ai dono, da matha-them, no da matha nais lukin matha, kaina fea, no--nais ledi.

No, (she's) Filipino, or Hawaiian, a mixture of everything, I don't know; their mother (is) good-looking, though, rather light-skinned--a nice lady.

 

LANGUAGE SAMPLES FROM PIDGIN SPEAKERS
WHOSE FIRST LANGUAGE IS PHILIPPINE

MF64M

hi kam gro da faemili.

The family began to grow up.

 

he halp da medisin.

The medicine helps.

MF71H

hi shut me da gan.

The gun will shoot me.

MF74O

ai dono wea dei kam fram da sak.

I don't know where the sharks come from.

MF64K

no good da luna.

The foreman (was) no good.

MF64M

mo plaeni da ilokano en da tagalog.

(There were) more Ilocano (speakers) than Tagalog (speakers).

FF70H

oni tu handrid poati da salari.

The salary (was) only 240 (pesos).

MF69M

papaya, daet wan. gud, papaya.

That one's a papaya. (They're) good, papayas.

MF64M

wok had diws pipl.

These people work hard.

MF85O

he get da hawaian waif.

He has a Hawaiian wife.

MF69H

had to fain da waif hia.

It's hard to find a wife here.

MF69H

yu no dis wan, a, da pig, a? da mit, pig. arait. yu mek gu da slais.

You know this stuff, pork, yes? The meat, pork. All right, you cut a good slice.

MF71H

lilibit ai no nau da baibal--istawri pram da gad.

I now know the Bible a little--God's story.

MF71H

ai no da had wrka, mai pren.

I know what hard work is, my friend.

MF75M

no kaen du nating abaut da eniting insaid da haus.

(They) can't do anything about anything inside the house.

MF85O

ai meik da paip. you no da bambu, hi kaen. yae, da bambu.

I made pipes. You know one can (do that) with bamboo. Yeah, with bamboo.

MF69H

oni tek tu slais da bred aen, a, wan da eg.

(I) just take two slices of bread and one egg.

MF70H

mai neiba hauli oa dea awl daet taim dei drink da bia bat ai no drink.

All that time my white neighbors over there were drinking beer, but I didn't drink.

MF69H

nau ai go da dawkta.

Now I'm going to the doctor.

Interviewer

hau kam? wai you go dakta?

Why? Why are you going to the doctor?

MF77H

baimbai ai tink no, no mo pai minit ai go kawl. pau kawl, kaukau.

Then I though, in just five minutes I'll call (on the phone). When I've called, I'll eat.

MF69H

beta yu moemoe, aen lai daun yu bed. aen den, ae, you pau islip, an den yu wek at, you kaukau agen.

It's better if you sleep, and lie down on your bed, and then, when

MF85O

yu get no mo mani tu beil aut you shtei ova dea baut paib deiz pau.

If you haven't any money to make bail you stay over there about five days and that's all.

 

meik taenk po daetz ship po go kip da wada po da ship.

Make tanks for those sheep, to hold the water for the sheep.

MF71H

go weis da teip.

The tape will be wasted.

MF77H

go tek tu fala go hapai dis wan.

Take two men and carry this one.

MF71H

ai no tel you palas go join pentikosta.

I'm not telling you to join the Pentecostal (Church).

MF75M

daet taim ai stei livin oba hia, bat.

But at that time I was living over here.

FF70H

bat nau stei reinin es wai ai wori.

But I'm worried because it's raining now.

MF69H

if no wrk, ai stei sliping!

If there's no work, I sleep!

FF70H

samtaim wan de tu de stei gat twentipai baeg.

Sometimes twenty-five bags are gathered in one or two days.

Interviewer

You live over here?

 

MF74O

yae, bepaw, oni laes mant ai bin mob odea.

(I did) before, just last month I moved over there.

 

dei bin sein da law.

They have changed the law.


1. Bickerton, Derek, and Carol Odo. 1976. Change and variation in Hawaiian English, vol. 1 of 3 volumes, General phonology and Pidgin syntax. Final Report on National Science Foundation Grant No. GS-39748. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Social Sciences and Linguistics Institute.